Archive for the ‘Commerce Dept’ Category

BIS Implements Updates to Improve SNAP-R for License Application Submissions

Monday, October 16th, 2017 by Danielle McClellan

By: Ashleigh Foor

Per the request of the export controls industry, BIS has designed new updates for the Single Network Application Process-Redesign (SNAP-R), BIS’s electronic system for the submission of license applications, commodity classification requests, License Exception AGR notifications, and License Exception STA eligibility requests. This will be the first in a series of updates meant to make SNAP­-­R more user-friendly and efficient. Additional updates will be implemented in the future.

Included in the new updates is the introduction of security questions. Before this update, SNAP-R users would have to request assistance from SNAP-R account administrators or BIS to reset login IDs and passwords and to receive a reminder of their company identification number (CIN). Starting now, all new SNAP-R registrants will be required to provide answers to four of ten security questions as part of the registration process. Moving forward, the security questions put into place will identify and help users retrieve information on their own. Existing users will be prompted to choose security questions and answers at their next login.

Other changes include:

  • Work Item Reference Numbers: SNAP-R account holders are no longer limited to the previously required format (i.e., AAA####) for Work Item reference numbers.
  • Line Item Value Calculation: When listing the information for an export item on a license application, SNAP-R account holders can now choose to calculate the value of the item by multiplying the unit value by the quantity of items or to enter the total price of the item independent of the item’s quantity and unit value.

Other SNAP-R Features: Did you know that SNAP-R:

  • Can be used on browsers other than Internet Explorer®?
  • Has a spell check function?
  • Allows a previously created Work Item (e.g., a license application) to be used again when preparing a new Work Item for submission?

The SNAP-R manual has been revised and updated to incorporate the changes above as well as to clarify the tools available to SNAP-R system users. (https://www.bis.doc.gov/snap-r-updates)

House Budget Committee Proposes Moving BIS to State

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 by Danielle McClellan

(Source: U.S. House Budget Committee Report)

The following is an excerpt (pages 49-50) from the U.S. House Budget Committee, Building a Better America: A Plan for Fiscal Responsibility.

Building a Better America recommends a different path for the Department of Commerce.

Our budget supports the recent Presidential directives established by the Trump Administration to combat the regulatory burden placed on manufacturers and streamline the permitting review and approval processes. The Memorandum on Streamlining Permitting and Reducing Regulatory Burdens for Domestic Manufacturing (“Memorandum on Manufacturing”) provides for stakeholder engagement and feedback from the nation’s domestic manufacturers, in an effort to highlight unnecessary regulatory burdens and other administrative policies, practices, and procedures that inhibit economic growth and job creation. Our budget makes the following recommendations:

* Eliminate Corporate Welfare Programs in the Department of Commerce. Subsidies to businesses distort the economy, impose unfair burdens on taxpayers, and are especially problematic given the federal government’s fiscal situation. Programs under consideration for elimination could include the following:

  • The Hollings Manufacturing Extension Program. This program subsidizes a network of nonprofit extension centers that provide technical, financial, and marketing services for small and medium-size businesses. The private market generally provides these services. The program, which was supposed to be self-supporting, derives two-thirds of its funding from non-Federal sources.
  • The International Trade Administration [ITA]. This Department of Commerce agency provides trade-promotion services for U.S. companies. The fees it charges for its services do not cover the costs. Businesses can obtain similar services from state and local governments and the private market. Congress should eliminate the ITA or require it to charge for the full cost of these “Trade Promotion Authority” services.
  • The National Network for Manufacturing Innovation. This program, previously known as the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Consortia, provides federal grants to support research for commercial technology and manufacturing. As stated in the Heritage Foundation’s The Budget Book: “Businesses should not receive taxpayer subsidies; these long-lived and unnecessary subsidies increase federal spending and distort the marketplace. Corporate welfare to politically connected corporations should end.”

 

* Eliminate Overlap and Consolidate Necessary Department of Commerce Functions Into Other Departments. Since its establishment in 1903, the Commerce Department has expanded in size and scope to include many activities better suited at other agencies. The Department of Commerce and its various agencies and programs are rife with waste, abuse, and duplication. This budget recommends the following dissolution, delegation of authority, and consolidation measures:

  • Consolidate National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration functions into the Department of the Interior;
  • Establish the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office as an independent agency;
  • Eliminate the International Trade Administration; o Delegate trade enforcement activities to the International Trade Commission;
  • Consolidate the Bureau of Industry and Security into the Department of State;
  • Eliminate the Economic Development Administration;
  • Consolidate trade adjustment activities within the Department of Labor, which has a duplicate program;
  • Consolidate the Minority Business Development Agency into the Small Business Administration;
  • Consolidate the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Technical Information Services within the National Science Foundation; o Consolidate the National Telecommunication and Information Administration into the Federal Communications Commission as an independent agency; and
  • Consolidate the United States Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis into the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.

BIS Amends EAR Concerning Burma

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017 by Danielle McClellan

In Executive Order 13742 of October 7, 2016, President Obama terminated the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13047 and revoked that Executive Order and the five additional Burma-related Executive Orders, including Executive Orders 13310, 13448 and 13464. Consistent with the President’s action, in this final rule, BIS removes and reserves § 744.22 of the EAR.

Effective December 27, 2016, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has removed the license requirements and other restrictions on exports, reexports or transfers (in country) of items subject to the EAR made to person whose property and interests in property were blocked pursuant to three Burma-related Executive Orders  that were revoked on October 7, 2016. This rule also moves Burma from Country Group D:1 to Country Group B, a less restrictive country group placement.

Note, however, that Burma will remain in Country Group D:3 (countries raising proliferation concerns related to chemical and biological weapons). Burma will also remain in Country Group D:5 (U.S. Arms Embargoes), consistent with § 126.1 of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, 22 CFR 120–130. Therefore, the country is subject to the general license exception restrictions described in section 740.2(a)(12) of the EAR that apply to 9×515 or ‘‘600 series’’ items destined to, shipped from, or manufactured in a destination listed in Country Group D:5, except as narrowly provided in subparagraphs (a)(12)(i) and (ii). Further, Burma will remain in Computer Tier 3 in part 740 (License Exceptions) pending additional consideration. Finally, as a general matter, exports and reexports to Burma, and transfers (in country), remain subject to EAR part 744 end user and end-use based controls.

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-12-27/pdf/2016-31208.pdf

Final ECR Revisions for Spacecraft Published

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017 by Danielle McClellan

The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has published a final rule that will be effective January 15, 2017, and will complete the administration’s goal of moving spacecraft and related items that no longer warrant control under the United states Munitions List (USML) Category XV to the Commerce Control List (CCL). This final rule addresses issues raised in, and public comments, on the interim final rule that was published on May 13, 2014 and groups the changes into four types of changes:

  1. Changes to address the movement of additional spacecraft and related items from the USML to the Commerce Control List (CCL), as a result of changes in aperture size for spacecraft that warrant ITAR control, in response to public comments and further U.S. Government review;
  2. Changes to address the movement of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) from the USML to the CCL;
  3. Other corrections and clarifications to the spacecraft interim final rule; and
  4. Addition of .y items to Export Control Classification Number 9A515

The first type of changes (Changes To Address the Movement of Additional Spacecraft and Related Items From the USML to the CCL) are:

  • In § 740.20, paragraph (g) (License Exception STA eligibility requests for 9×515 and ‘‘600 series’’ end items), this final rule revises paragraph (g)(1) as a conforming change to the changes made to ECCN 9A515.a, described below.
    • To maintain the same scope of paragraph (g)(1), this final rule removes the text that referred to ECCN 9A515.a and adds in its place text referencing ‘‘spacecraft’’ in 9A515.a.1, .a.2, .a.3, or .a.4, or items in 9A515.g.
    • The spacecraft in ECCN 9A515.a.5 are eligible for License Exception STA without a § 740.20(g) request. As a conforming change, this final rule adds ECCN 9E515.b, .d, .e, or .f as eligible for § 740.20(g) License Exception STA eligibility requests.
    • Because the scope of revised paragraph (g) includes items other than end items, this final rule also revises the heading of paragraph (g) to remove the term ‘‘end items’’ and add in its place the term ‘‘items.’’ However, the items eligible to be submitted under the § 740.20(g) process are still limited to those specific ECCNs and ‘‘items’’ paragraphs identified in paragraph (g).
  • The spacecraft transferred to the CCL in this final rule are subject to special regional stability license requirements. Therefore, in § 742.6 (Regional stability), this final rule makes revisions to five paragraphs.
  • The final rule revises paragraph (a)(1), adds a new paragraph (a)(8), revises paragraph (b)(1)(i), and adds paragraphs (b)(5) and (b)(6). These changes are described below.
    • In § 742.6, paragraph (a)(1) (RS Column 1 license requirements in general), this final rule adds a reference to new paragraph (a)(8).
    • New paragraph (a)(8) (Special RS Column 1 license requirement applicable to certain spacecraft and related items) is an RS Column 1 license requirement, which is specific to certain spacecraft and related items. This paragraph specifies that a license is required for all destinations, including Canada, for spacecraft and related items classified under ECCN 9A515.a.1, .a.2., .a.3., .a.4., .g, and ECCN 9E515.f.
    • Although the license requirement for these specified ECCN 9×515 items is more restrictive than for those 9×515 items on the CCL prior to publication of this rule, the license review policy is the same as those for other 9×515 items. As a conforming change, this final rule revises the fourth sentence of paragraph (b)(1)(i) to add a reference to paragraph (a)(8), because that sentence references the ECCN 9×515 license requirements, which now include those special RS license requirements in paragraph (a)(8).
  • This final rule adds two new paragraphs, paragraph (b)(5) (Spacecraft for launch) and paragraph (b)(6) (Remote sensing spacecraft) to specify the requirements that apply for license applications involving spacecraft and remote sensing spacecraft.
    • Consistent with the requirements in paragraph (y) in Supplement No. 2 to part 748 Unique Application and Submission Requirements, this final rule adds paragraphs (b)(5)(i) and (b)(5)(ii) to specify when applications to export or reexport a ‘‘spacecraft’’ controlled under ECCN 9A515.a for launch in or by a country will or may require a technology transfer control plan (DoD), an encryption technology control plan approved by the National Security Agency (NSA), and DoD monitoring of all launch activities. Paragraph (b)(5)(i) specifies that this is a requirement for all such applications for countries that are not a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) or a major non-NATO ally of the United States. This final rule adds a similar requirement under paragraph (b)(5)(ii), but with the key distinction that it may require for countries that are a member of NATO or a major non-NATO ally of the United States.  (TCP) approved by the Department of Defense
  • Also in § 742.6, this final rule adds a new paragraph (b)(6) (Remote sensing spacecraft) to make applicants aware that any application for ‘‘spacecraft’’ described in ECCN 9A515.a.1,.a.2, a.3, or .a.4, for sensitive remote sensing components described in 9A515.g, or for ‘‘technology’’ described in ECCN 9E515.f, may require a government-to- government agreement at the discretion of the U.S. Government. A government- to-government agreement may be required for any destination at the sole discretion of the U.S. Government.
  • In § 750.4 (Procedures for processing license applications), as conforming changes to the changes described above to § 742.6, this final rule makes the following two changes: adds a new paragraph (b)(8), and adds a new paragraph (d)(2)(iv). These changes are described in the next two paragraphs.
  • In § 750.4, consistent with the requirements in paragraph (y) in Supplement No. 2 to part 748 Unique Application and Submission Requirements, this final rule adds a new paragraph (b)(8) (Satellites for launch) to include a requirement for license applications involving a satellite for launch.
    • Applicants must obtain approval by the DoD of a technology transfer control plan and the approval of the NSA of an encryption technology control plan.
    • In addition, the applicant will also be required to make arrangements with the DoD for monitoring of all launch activities.
    • These existing DoD and NSA requirements in regards to satellites for launch are in addition to the EAR licensing requirements, but any license authorized under the EAR for satellites for launch must also be done in accordance with those DoD and NSA requirements to be authorized under an EAR license. Therefore, this final rule adds this requirement to § 750.4(b)(8), which will eliminate the need to add this requirement as a license condition for any license for satellites for launch.
    • These DoD and NSA TCP approval requirements existed under the ITAR and are added to the EAR to preserve the status quo. Therefore, although this paragraph adds three new requirements to the EAR for license applications for spacecraft for launch, the requirements are the same as when these spacecraft were formerly under the ITAR, so there will be no increased burden on exporters, reexporters or transferors.
  • In § 750.4, this final rule adds a new paragraph (d)(2)(iv) (Remote Sensing Interagency Working Group (RSIWG)) to make applicants aware that the RSIWG, chaired by the State Department, will review license applications involving remote sensing spacecraft. These will be any items described in ECCN 9A515.a.1, .a.2, .a.3, or .a.4, sensitive remote sensing components described in 9A515.g, or ‘‘technology’’ described in 9E515.f.
  • ECCN 9A515: This final rule adds a new License Requirement Note, revises the Special Conditions for STA section, revises ‘‘items’’ paragraph (a), and adds paragraph (g) in the List of ‘‘items’’ controlled section of ECCN 9E515. These changes are described in the next five paragraphs.
  • Addition of License Requirement Note to 9A515. As a conforming change to the addition of § 742.6(a)(8), described above, this final rule adds a License Requirement Note to the end of the License Requirements section of ECCN 9A515 to specify that the Commerce Country Chart is not used for determining license requirements for commodities classified as 9A515.a.1, .a.2., .a.3., .a.4, and .g. The new License Requirement also includes a cross reference to § 742.6(a)(8) and alerts exporters and reexporters that these commodities are subject to a worldwide license requirement.
  • In ECCN 9A515, Special Conditions for STA section, this final rule revises paragraph (1). This final rule adds references to the new ‘‘items’’ paragraphs of ECCN 9A515.a (9A515.a.1, .a.2, .a.3 and .a.4) and 9A515.g, which would not be eligible for License Exception STA, unless determined by BIS to be eligible for License Exception STA in accordance with § 740.20(g) (License Exception STA eligibility requests for certain 9×515 and ‘‘600 series’’ end items). Because these items are commodities that are more sensitive, additional U.S. Government review of the specific commodity is warranted prior to allowing exporters, reexporters or transferors to use License Exception STA. The imposition of this requirement is consistent with the use of the paragraph (g) process for other sensitive items in the 9×515 ECCNs and the ‘‘600 series’’ that have been moved to the CCL. Also in the Special Conditions for STA section, this final rule redesignates paragraph (2) as paragraph (3) and adds a new paragraph (2). This final rule adds new paragraph (2) in the Special Conditions for STA section to exclude the use of License Exception if the ‘‘spacecraft’’ controlled in ECCN 9A515.a.1, .a.2, .a.3, or .a.4 contains a separable or removable propulsion system enumerated in USML Category IV(d)(2) or USML Category XV(e)(12) and designated MT. This exclusion is being added because the MTCR Category I components identified in this paragraph are separable or removable and therefore for consistency with the intent to exclude MT items from License Exception STA eligibility, this final rule adds this as an additional restriction on the use of License Exception STA.
  • In ECCN 9A515.a, this final rule revises ‘‘items’’ paragraph (a) to add control parameters for the additional spacecraft being moved from the USML to the CCL. Spacecraft moved from the USML to the CCL and classified under ECCN 9A515.a prior to publication of this rule are being moved to new ‘‘items’’ paragraph (a)(5). This final rule adds ‘‘items’’ paragraphs (a)(1), (a)(2), (a)(3) and (a)(4) to ECCN 9A515 to control the additional spacecraft items being moved to the CCL. The identification of these more sensitive spacecraft items in their own ‘‘items’’ level paragraph in ECCN 9A515 (9A515.a.1, .a.2, .a.3., .a.4) will allow for the imposition of more restrictive controls that are needed, while not impacting other spacecraft and related items that do not warrant the more restrictive controls (e.g., 9A515.a.5). These more restrictively controlled items consist of the following: ‘‘spacecraft,’’ including satellites, and space vehicles, whether designated developmental, experimental, research or scientific, not enumerated in USML Category XV or described in ECCN 9A004 that have electro-optical remote sensing capabilities and having a clear aperture greater than 0.35 meters, but less than or equal to 0.50 meters (under ECCN 9A515.a.1). It includes those having remote sensing capabilities beyond NIR (under ECCN 9A515.a.2), those having radar remote sensing capabilities (e.g., AESA, SAR, or ISAR) having a center frequency equal to or greater than 1.0 GHz, but less than 10.0 GHz and having a bandwidth equal to or greater than 100 MHz, but less than 300 MHz (under 9A515.a.3). These more sensitive items being moved from the USML to the CCL also include those providing space-based logistics, assembly, or servicing of another ‘‘spacecraft’’ (under ECCN 9A515.a.4).
  • In ECCN 9A515.g, this final rule also adds ‘‘items’’ paragraph (g) to 9A515, as related to the changes described above to 9A515.a. Paragraph (g) is added to control remote sensing components that are ‘‘specially designed’’ for ‘‘spacecraft’’ described in ECCN 9A515.a.1 though 9A515.a.4, which were described above. Similar to the reason for identifying the items in ECCN 9A515.a.1 through .a.4., specifying that these remote sensing components are the ‘‘items’’ paragraphs (g)(1) through (g)(3) will allow the imposition of more restrictive controls on these components, without needing to impose the same level of restrictions on 9A515.x items, which is the paragraph under which these components would have been controlled if this new 9A515.g paragraph were not being added. Paragraph (g) controls remote sensing components for space-qualified optics with the largest lateral clear aperture dimension equal to or less than 0.35 meters; or with the largest clear aperture dimension greater than 0.35 meters but less than or equal to 0.50 meters (under ECCN 9A515.g.1). In addition, paragraph (g) controls optical bench assemblies ‘‘specially designed’’ for the spacecraft added to ECCN 9A515.a.1 through .a.4 (under ECCN 9A515.g.2), and primary, secondary, or hosted payloads that perform a function of spacecraft added to 9A515.a.1. through .a.4. (under 9A515.g.3).
  • ECCN 9E515: This final rule adds a new License Requirement Note, revises the Special Conditions for STA section and ‘‘items’’ paragraph (a), and adds ‘‘items’’ paragraph (f) in the List of ‘‘items’’ controlled section of ECCN 9E515. These changes are described in the next five paragraphs:
    • Addition of License Requirement Note to 9E515. As a conforming change to the addition of § 742.6(a)(8), described above, this final rule adds a License Requirement Note to the end of the License Requirements section of ECCN 9E515 to specify that the Commerce Country Chart is not used for determining license requirements for ‘‘technology’’ classified 9E515.f. The new License Requirement also includes a cross reference to § 742.6(a)(8) and alerts exporters and reexporters that this ‘‘technology’’ is subject to a worldwide license requirement.
    • In ECCN 9E515, Special Conditions for STA section, this final rule revises paragraph (1) to add a reference to 9E515.f. This final rule specifies that such technology is not eligible for STA, unless the specific technology has been approved under the § 740.20(g) process by the U.S. Government. This change is made to conform to the addition described below of ‘‘technology’’ under ECCN 9E515.f for the additional spacecraft and related components added to 9A515.a and .g described above. In addition, this final rule also specifies that the ‘‘technology’’ controlled under ECCN 9E515.b, .d and .e are not eligible for License Exception STA, unless the specific ‘‘technology’’ has been approved under the § 740.20(g) process by the U.S. Government. Prior to publication of this final rule, ECCN 9E515.b, .d and .e ‘‘technology’’ was excluded from License Exception STA in all cases, which based on public comments and interagency discussions was a more restrictive policy than was needed to protect U.S. national security and foreign policy interests for this ‘‘technology’’ classified under ECCN 9E515. Therefore, this final rule makes the other ‘‘technology’’ (9E515.b, .d and .e) also eligible for the requests under § 740.20(g), as described above in the changes this final rule makes to paragraph (g) of License Exception STA.
    • In ECCN 9E515.a, this final rule revises ‘‘items’’ paragraph (a) to exclude the ‘‘technology’’ for the new commodities added to 9A515.a (.a.1 through .a.4) and .g. ‘‘Required’’ ‘‘technology’’ for these new commodities added to ECCN 9A515.a and .g will be controlled under ECCN 9E515, but in order to impose more restrictive controls on those ‘‘technologies’’ without impacting other 9E515 ‘‘technology,’’ this final rule adds this ‘‘technology’’ being moved to the CCL to a new ‘‘items’’ paragraph (f) to 9E515, as described below.
    • In ECCN 9E515.f, this final rule adds a new ‘‘items’’ paragraph (f) in the List of Items Controlled section to control ‘‘technology’’ ‘‘required’’ for the ‘‘development,’’ ‘‘production,’’ installation, repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of commodities that this final rule adds to ECCN 9A515 under ‘‘items’’ paragraphs .a.1 through .a.4, or .g. As described above, this final rule is identifying these ‘‘technologies’’ in their own ‘‘items’’ paragraph in order to allow more restrictive controls to be placed on these items without impacting other ECCN 9E515 ‘‘technology.’’

 

The second types of changes (Changes To Address the Movement of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) From the USML to the CCL) are:

  • ECCN 9A004: This final rule revises ECCN 9A004 to add a specific telescope, which was ‘‘subject to the ITAR’’ prior to the effective date of this final rule. A determination was made based on the public comments received by the Department of State and the space interagency working group (a group of U.S. Government agencies involved in the export control system and that deal with space related issues) that this specific telescope was within the scope of spacecraft and related items that did not warrant being subject to the ITAR. Therefore, consistent with the stated purpose of the May 13 rule, as well as section 38(f) of the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), the Department of State has moved this telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which is being developed, launched, and operated under the supervision of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to the CCL. The ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ and ‘‘attachments’’ that are ‘‘specially designed’’ for use in or with the JWST are also being moved from the ITAR and will be subject to the EAR, as of the effective date of the State and Commerce final rules.
  • To control the JWST and the ‘‘specially designed’’ ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ and ‘‘attachments’’ for the JWST, this final rule adds two new ‘‘items’’ paragraph to ECCN 9A004. First, this final rule adds a new ‘‘items’’ paragraph (u) to 9A004 to control the JWST (the specific telescope) that is being moved to the CCL from the USML. Second, this final rule adds a new ‘‘items’’ paragraph (v) to control the ‘‘specially designed’’ ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ or ‘‘attachments’’ for use in or with the JWST. The commodities this final rule adds to ECCN 9A004.v include the primary and secondary payloads of the JWST.
  • This final rule also specifies in the control parameters in the new paragraph (v)(1) to (v)(4) that the ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ and ‘‘attachments’’ specified in paragraph (v) do not include items that are ‘‘subject to the ITAR,’’ microelectronic circuits, items in ECCNs 7A004 and 7A104, or in any ECCN containing ‘‘space qualified’’ as a control criterion (See ECCN 9A515.x.4). As a conforming change, this final rule revises the phrase ‘‘ECCN 9A004.x’’ in paragraph (y) to add a reference to the ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ and ‘‘attachments’’ in paragraph (v) that this final rule adds. This final rule revises the phrase, so it now specifies ‘‘ECCN 9A004.v or .x,’’ which is being done to account for the fact that paragraphs (v) and (x) will contain certain ‘‘specially designed’’ ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ and ‘‘attachments’’ for items enumerated in ECCN 9A004 and that the new items being added to paragraph (v) and (x) could be reclassified under 9A004.y, if subsequently the specific item is identified in an interagency-cleared commodity classification (CCATS) pursuant to § 748.3(e) as warranting control in 9A004.y. BIS anticipates an increase of approximately 20 license applications per year as a result of these changes to the EAR.
  • In addition to the change to ECCN 9A004, this final rule makes changes to three 9×515 ECCNs to reflect that the JWST and the ‘‘specially designed’’ ‘‘parts,’’ ‘‘components,’’ ‘‘accessories,’’ and ‘‘attachments’’ for the JWST are being added to 9A004. This final rule makes these conforming changes to ECCNs 9A515, 9B515 and 9E515. These are not substantive changes. These changes are described in the next three paragraphs.
  • ECCN 9A515. This final rule revises the third sentence of the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section of ECCN 9A515 to add a reference to the JWST. This final rule also revises the Note to ECCN 9A515.a to specify items in ECCN 9A004 are not within the scope of 9A515.a. A reference to ECCN 9A004 needs to be added because the description of this Note to ECCN 9A515.a would otherwise include the JWST. This final rule revises ‘‘items’’ paragraph (b) in ECCN 9A515, to add a reference to ECCN 9A004.u for the JWST. This conforming change is needed to specify that ground control systems and training simulators ‘‘specially designed’’ for telemetry, tracking and control of the JWST are also within the scope of ECCN 9A515.b. For similar reasons, this final rule revises ‘‘items’’ paragraph (e) to add a reference to ECCN 9A004.u. This conforming change is made to specify that the microelectronic circuits and discrete electronic components described in ECCN 9A515.e include those ‘‘specially designed’’ for the JWST. This final rule also makes some changes to the .y paragraph in ECCN 9A515, which are discussed further below.
  • ECCN 9B515. This final rule revises ‘‘items’’ paragraph (a) in the List of Items Controlled section to add a reference to ECCN 9A004.u. This conforming change is needed to specify that the test, inspection, and production ‘‘equipment’’ ‘‘specially designed’’ for the ‘‘production’’ or ‘‘development’’ of the JWST are also classified under ECCN 9B515.a. For similar reasons, this final rule revises the Note to ECCN 9B515.a to add a reference to ECCN 9A004.u. This conforming change is intended to specify that ECCN 9B515.a includes equipment, cells, and stands ‘‘specially designed’’ for the analysis or isolation of faults in the JWST, in addition to the other commodities enumerated in the Note to ECCN 9A515.a.
  • ECCN 9E515: This final rule also revises the third sentence in the ‘‘Related Controls’’ paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section in ECCN 9E515 to add a reference to the JWST. This sentence will alert persons classifying technology for the JWST to see ECCNs 9E001 and 9E002.

The third types of changes are (Other Corrections and Clarifications to Interim Spacecraft Final Rule):

  • ECCN 9A515: This final rule adds two sentences at the end of the introductory text in the ‘‘items’’ paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section of ECCN 9A515, consistent with the notes to USML Category XV. The introductory paragraph clarifies when ‘‘spacecraft’’ and other items described in ECCN 9A515 remain subject to the EAR even if exported, reexported, or transferred (in-country) with defense articles ‘‘subject to the ITAR’’ integrated into and included therein as integral parts of the item. This introductory paragraph includes some application examples and some qualifiers for when the ITAR jurisdiction would reapply to such defense articles. This final rule adds two new sentences to clarify two additional instances where the jurisdiction of the ITAR would be applicable in such scenarios. The first new sentence is being added to clarify that the removal of a defense article subject to the ITAR from the spacecraft is a retransfer under the ITAR—meaning the removal of a defense article would require an ITAR authorization. The ITAR authorization requirement would apply regardless of which CCL authorization the spacecraft is exported under the EAR. The second sentence clarifies that transfer of technical data regarding the defense article subject to the ITAR integrated into the spacecraft would require an ITAR authorization.
  • ECCN 9B515: This final rule revises the License Requirements section of ECCN 9B515 to add a missile technology (MT) control. The MT control is being added to impose a license requirement on equipment in ECCN 9B515.a that is for the ‘‘development’’ or ‘‘production’’ of commodities in USML Category XV(e)(12) and XV(e)(19) that are MT controlled. This change is made to conform to the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) Annex and the corresponding MT controls in USML Category XV (MTCR Annex, Category I: Item 2.B.2.). BIS anticipates an increase of approximately 10 license applications per year as a result of this change to the EAR, along with the conforming MT change made to ECCN 9E515 described in the next paragraph.
  • ECCN 9E515: This final rule, as a conforming change to the change to ECCN 9B515, revises the MT Control paragraph in the License Requirements section on ECCN 9E515. This final rule revises the MT Control paragraph in ECCN 9E515 to add technology for items in 9B515.a that are controlled for MT reasons. This change is made to conform to the MTCR Annex and the corresponding MT controls in USML Category XV (MTCR Annex, Category I: Item 2.E.1.).

The fourth type (Addition of .y Items to ECCN 9A515) of changes:

  • This final rule adds five .y paragraphs (ECCN 9A515.y.2, .y.3., .y.4, .y.5, and .y.6) as additional commodities specified under paragraph (y) in this ECCN. As noted in the introductory text of paragraph (y), the U.S. Government through the § 748.3(e) process will identify the items that warrant being classified under 9×515.y, such as the commodities being specified under ECCN 9A515.y.2 to .y.6 in this final rule. Specifically, the following space grade or for spacecraft applications commodities: thermistors (ECCN 9A515.y.2); RF microwave bandpass ceramic filters (dielectric resonator bandpass filters) (9A515.y.3); space grade or for spacecraft applications hall effect sensors (9A515.y.4); subminiature (SMA and SMP) plugs and connectors, TNC plugs and cable and connector assemblies with SMA plugs and connectors (9A515.y.5); and flight cable assemblies (9A515.y.6) have been identified in interagency-cleared commodity classifications (CCATS) pursuant to § 748.3(e) as warranting control in 9A515.y.2 to .y.6. The additions described above for ECCN 9A515.y.2 to y.6 are the second set of approved populations of .y controls being added to 9A515. As stated in the May 13 rule, as well as the July 13 rule (which added ECCN 9A515.y.1), BIS (along with State and Defense) will continue to populate the 9A515.y with additional entries as additional classification determinations are made in response to requests from the public under § 748.3(e).

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-01-10/pdf/2016-31755.pdf

The Last Hoorah for Reform?

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Over three years ago (April 2013) the first set of Export Control Reform regulations were published in the Federal Register, they were over 100 pages long and made the regulations more complex but also significantly relaxed controls on some items. Over the last few years reform has come in the form of waves and moved items from the USML onto the CCL in batches. Now, as the Obama Administration is moving out it looks as though we are about to see the last list shift for a while.

The final rule, which will be effective December 31, 2016, will move specific items controlled under Category XIV and Category XVIII. Basically, items that have been determined to no longer warrant ITAR control (toxicological agents, including chemical agents, biological agents, and associated equipment, along with directed energy weapons) will be controlled under the Commerce Control List (CCL). The affected Category XIV items consist of dissemination, detection, and protection “equipment” and related articles, such as production and test “equipment,” and will be controlled under new ECCNs 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, 1D607 and 1E607. The affected Category XVIII articles will follow in suit with being primarily tooling, production “equipment,” test and evaluation “equipment,” test models, and related articles and will be controlled under new ECCNs 6B619, 6D619, and 6E619.

Specific Regulation Changes:

ITAR:

  • This final rule adopts for those pathogens and toxins that meet specific capabilities listed in paragraph (b) the ‘‘Tier 1’’ pathogens and toxins established in the Department of Health and Human Services and the United States Department of Agriculture select agents and toxins regulations (42 CFR part 73 and 9 CFR part 121). The Tier 1 pathogens and toxins that do not meet these capabilities remain controlled in Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 1C351 on the CCL.
  • Additionally, this rule, in concert with the analogous rule published by the Department of Commerce, moves riot control agents to the export jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce, as well as the articles covered previously in paragraphs (j), (k), and (l), which include test facilities, equipment for the destruction of chemical and biological agents, and tooling for production of articles in paragraph (f), respectively.
  • Other changes include the addition of paragraph (a)(5) to control chemical warfare agents ‘‘adapted for use in war’’ and not elsewhere enumerated, as well as the removal of paragraphs (f)(3) and (f)(6) and movement to the CCL of equipment for the sample collection and decontamination or remediation of chemical agents and biological agents.
  • Paragraph (f)(5) for collective protection was removed and partially combined in paragraph (f)(4) or the CCL.
  • Paragraph (g) enumerates antibodies, recombinant protective antigens, polynucleotides, biopolymers, or biocatalysts exclusively funded by a Department of Defense contract for detection of the biological agents listed in paragraph (b)(1)(ii).
  • The Department notes that the controls in paragraph (f)(2) that include the phrase ‘‘developed under a Department of Defense contract or other funding authorization’’ do not apply when the Department of Defense acts solely as a servicing agency for a contract on behalf of another agency of the U.S. government. Moreover, ‘‘other funding authorization’’ refers to other funding authorization from the Department of Defense.
  • The Department notes that the controls in paragraphs (g)(1) and (h) that include the phrase ‘‘exclusively funded by a Department of Defense contract’’ do not apply when the Department of Defense acts solely as a servicing agency for a contract on behalf of another agency of the U.S. government, or, for example, in cases where the Department of Defense provides initial funding for the development of an item but another agency of the U.S. government provides funding to further develop or adapt the item.
  • Paragraph (h) enumerates certain vaccines funded exclusively by the Department of Defense, as well as certain vaccines controlled in (h)(4) that are specially designed for the sole purpose of protecting against biological agents and biologically derived substances identified in (b). Thus, the scope of vaccines controlled in (h)(4) is circumscribed by the nature of funding and the satisfaction of the term ‘‘specially designed’’ as that term is defined in ITAR § 120.41. In evaluating the scope of this control, please note that the Department offers a decision tool to aid exporters in determining whether a defense article meets the definition of ‘‘specially designed.’’ This tool is available at http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/licensing/dtSpeciallyDesigned.htm.
  • Paragraph (i) is updated to provide better clarity on the scope of the control by including examples of Department of Defense tools that are used to determine or estimate potential effects of chemical or biological weapons strikes and incidents in order to plan to mitigate their impacts.
  • A new paragraph (x) has been added to USML Category XIV, allowing ITAR licensing on behalf of the Department of Commerce for commodities, software, and technology subject to the EAR, provided those commodities, software, and technology are to be used in or with defense articles controlled in USML Category XIV and are described in the purchase documentation submitted with the application. The intent of paragraph (x) is not to impose ITAR jurisdiction on commodities, software, and technology subject to EAR controls. Items described in paragraph (x) remain subject to the jurisdiction of the EAR. The Department added the paragraph as a regulatory reference point in response to industry requests to be able to use a Department of State license to export shipments that have a mix of ITAR controlled items and EAR controlled items for use in or with items described in that category.
  • Finally, this rule establishes USML control in subparagraph (f)(2) of certain chemical or biological agent equipment only when it contains reagents, algorithms, coefficients, software, libraries, spectral databases, or alarm set point levels developed under a Department of Defense contract or other funding authorization.

EAR:

This final rule creates five new “600 series” ECCNs in CCL Category 1 (ECCNs 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, 1D607, and 1E607) that clarify the EAR controls applicable to certain dissemination, detection and protection “equipment” and related items that the President has determined no longer warrant control under USML Category XIV. Terms such as “part,” “component” “accessories,” “attachments,” and “specially designed” are applied in the same manner in this rule as those terms are defined in Section 772.1 of the EAR. In addition, to assist exporters in determining the control status of their items, a “Specially Designed” Decision Tool and a CCL Order of Review Decision Tool are available on the BIS Web site at: http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/decision-tree-tools.

  • New ECCN 1A607 Military dissemination “equipment” for riot control agents, military detection and protection “equipment” for toxicological agents (including chemical, biological, and riot control agents), and related commodities. In new ECCN 1A607, paragraphs .a through .d, paragraph .i, and paragraphs .l through .w are reserved. Paragraph .e of ECCN 1A607 controls “equipment” “specially designed” for military use and for the dissemination of any of the riot control agents controlled in ECCN 1C607.a. Paragraph .f of ECCN 1A607 controls protection “equipment” “specially designed” for military use and for defense against either materials controlled by USML Category XIV(a) or (b) or any of the riot control agents in new ECCN 1C607.a. Paragraph .g of ECCN 1A607 controls decontamination “equipment” not controlled by USML Category XIV(f) that is “specially designed” for military use and for the decontamination of objects contaminated with materials controlled by USML Category XIV(a) or (b). Paragraph .h controls “equipment” not controlled by USML Category XIV(f) that is “specially designed” for military use and for the detection or identification of either materials specified by USML Category XIV(a) or (b) or riot control agents controlled by new ECCN 1C607.a. Paragraph .j controls “equipment” “specially designed” to: (i) Interface with a detector, shelter, vehicle, vessel, or aircraft controlled by the USML or a “600 series” ECCN; and (ii) collect and process samples of articles controlled in USML Category XIV(a) or (b). Paragraph .k controls medical countermeasures that are “specially designed” for military use (including pre- and post- treatments, antidotes, and medical diagnostics) and “specially designed” to counter chemical agents controlled by USML Category XIV(a). Paragraph .x controls “parts,” “components,” “accessories,” and “attachments” that are “specially designed” for a commodity controlled under ECCN 1A607.e, .f, .g, .h, or .j or a defense article controlled in USML Category XIV(f) and that are not enumerated or otherwise described elsewhere in the USML.
  • New ECCN 1B607 Military test, inspection, and production “equipment” and related commodities “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of commodities identified in ECCN 1A607 or 1C607, or defense articles enumerated or otherwise described in USML Category XIV.
  • In new ECCN 1B607, paragraph .a controls “equipment,” not including incinerators, that is “specially designed” for the destruction of chemical agents controlled by USML Category XIV(a). Paragraph .b of ECCN 1B607 controls test facilities and “equipment” that are “specially designed” for military certification, qualification, or testing of commodities controlled by new ECCN 1A607.e, .f, .g, .h, or .j or by USML Category XIV(f), except for XIV(f)(1). Paragraph .c of ECCN 1B607 controls tooling and “equipment” “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of commodities controlled under new ECCN 1A607.e, .f, .g, .h, or .j or USML Category XIV(f). Paragraphs .d through .w are reserved. Paragraph .x controls “parts,” “components,” “accessories,” and “attachments,” not enumerated or otherwise described elsewhere in the USML, that are “specially designed” for a commodity controlled by ECCN 1B607.b or .c or for a defense article controlled by USML Category XIV(f). As indicated above, ECCN 1B607.b does not control test facilities and “equipment” that are “specially designed” for military certification, qualification, or testing of commodities and are enumerated or otherwise described in USML Category XIV(f)(1), as set forth in State’s companion rule to this final rule (e.g., see the equipment in USML Category XIV(f)(1)(ii) that is “specially designed” for testing the articles controlled in paragraph (a), (b), (c), (e), or (f)(4) of USML Category XIV). In addition to the test facilities and “equipment” controlled by ECCN 1B607.b, see the tooling and “equipment” classified under ECCN 2B350 or 2B352 for producing the chemical/biological agents, precursors, or defoliants described in USML Category XIV(a), (b), (c), or (e). The EAR also control tooling and “equipment” to produce the antibodies/polynucleotides and vaccines described in USML Category XIV(g) and (h), respectively, as follows: lab “equipment” designated as EAR99 under the EAR; biological dual-use “equipment” (including protective “equipment”) classified under ECCN 2B352; and EAR-controlled biological systems for making vaccines (involving the use of mice, rabbits, etc.).
  • New ECCN 1C607?Tear gases, riot control agents and materials for the detection and decontamination of chemical warfare agents. New ECCN 1C607.a controls specified tear gases and riot control agents. Paragraph .b of ECCN 1C607 controls “biopolymers” not controlled by USML Category XIV(g) that are “specially designed” or processed for the detection or identification of chemical warfare (CW) agents specified by USML Category XIV(a) and the cultures of specific cells used to produce them. Paragraph .c controls specified “biocatalysts” and biological systems that are not controlled by USML Category XIV(g) and are “specially designed” for the decontamination or degradation of CW agents specified by USML Category XIV(a). Paragraph .d controls chemical mixtures not controlled by USML Category XIV(f) that are “specially designed” for military use for the decontamination of objects contaminated with materials specified by USML Category XIV(a) or (b).
  • New ECCN 1D607?“Software” “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” operation, or maintenance of items controlled by 1A607, 1B607 or 1C607. New ECCN 1D607.a controls “software” “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” operation, or maintenance of items controlled by ECCN 1A607, 1B607 or 1C607. Paragraph .b of ECCN 1D607 is reserved.
  • New ECCN 1E607?“Technology” “required” for the “development,” “production,” operation, installation, maintenance, repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of items controlled by ECCN 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, or 1D607. New ECCN 1E607.a controls “technology” “required” for the “development,” “production,” operation, installation, maintenance, repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of items controlled by ECCN 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, or 1D607. Paragraph .b of ECCN 1E607 is reserved.
  • Amendments to License Exceptions BAG and TMP related to Individual Protection “Equipment” in ECCN 1A607.f. This final rule amends the License Exception BAG provisions in Section 740.14(h) of the EAR to authorize exports, reexports, or in-country transfers of chemical or biological agent protective gear consistent with the requirements and restrictions described therein. In a corresponding change, this final rule also amends the License Exception TMP provisions in Section 740.9(a)(11) of the EAR to authorize temporary exports, reexports, or in-country transfers of chemical or biological agent protective gear consistent with the requirements and restrictions described therein. The amendments to License Exceptions BAG and TMP also change the requirements for Afghanistan to be consistent with those of the majority of other Country Group D:5 destinations (i.e., the U.S. person authorized to use the license exception must be affiliated with the U.S. Government and be traveling on official business or traveling in support of a U.S. Government contract). The same requirement applies to the use of these license exception provisions for Iraq, also a D:5 country, with the additional option that the U.S. person must be traveling to Iraq under a direct authorization by the Government of Iraq and engaging in activities for, on behalf of, or at the request of, the Government of Iraq. These amendments are also intended to ensure that the scope of these license exceptions, as they apply to chemical or biological agent protective gear controlled under new ECCN 1A607.f, conforms with the scope of the ITAR exemption for personal protective equipment in Section 123.17 of the ITAR (e.g., by correcting the provisions for Afghanistan, as described above, to be consistent with those of the majority of other Country Group D:5 destinations).

BIS Extends Temporary General License for ZTE Entities

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

On March 24, 2016, a final rule was published that created a temporary general license that allowed, for a short time period, two entities (ZTE Corporation and ZTE Kangxun) that had been added to the Entity List on March 8, 2016, to be able to take part in exports, reexports, and transfers (in- country).

BIS has decided to extend the temporary general license until November 28, 2016. Due to this extension, the final rule will remove the date of August 30, 2016 and substitute the newest expiration date of November 28, 2016. No other changes have been made to the license.

Federal Register Notice: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-08-19/pdf/2016-19828.pdf

BIS Partially Reverses Historic EAR Penalty on ZTE—Red Flags Remain for All ZTE Transactions

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: John Black

In the March 24, 2106 Federal Register the Bureau of Industry and Security  temporarily reversed part of the most significant export control penalty in at least 32 years (i.e., as long as I have been in export compliance) which BIS imposed when it placed Chinese telecommunications giant ZTE in the EAR Entity List on March 8, 2016. The result of that action was to prohibit all exports and reexports of all items subject to the EAR to four named ZTE entities—this penalty far exceeds the multi-million dollar penalties BIS has imposed on others who have violated the EAR. For me, the only EAR action that approaches the significance of the ZTE penalty is the addition of 20 plus Delft companies to the Denial List back in the 1980s.

Please see Doug Jacobson’s excellent article on the original BIS action against ZTE after this article.

On March 24, 2016, BIS announced a temporary general license authorizing the use of EAR license exceptions and No License Required (NLR) according to the EAR in place prior to BIS adding these two ZTE entities that were put on the Entity List on March 8, 2016:

  • Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment (ZTE) Corporation (also referred to as ZTEC)
  • ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd.
  • These two ZTE entities remain on the EAR Entity List:
  • Beijing 8 Star International Co.
  • ZTE Parsian

By creating a temporary general license that is valid through June 30, 2016, BIS gives some relief to companies all over the world who do business with these two important entities which are critical companies that contribute significantly to ZTE’s global sales of over $16 billion. No doubt, in response to BIS’ addition of ZTE to its Entity List, ZTE and its lawyers flooded into a wide range of US Government entities requesting some sort of relief from the historically significant penalty.  I would have to guess that many non-ZTE companies expressed their concern to the US Government about how they were being harmed by the listing of ZTE.

Of course,  BIS may at any time cancel the temporary general license. Not only that, but the general license expires at the end of June if BIS takes no further action.   If you do business with ZTE, you should prepare for the worst even if you benefit now from the temporary general license.

Your Compliance Challenge Now:  Red Flags When Dealing with ZTE

Many exporters and reexporters have overlooked the fact that it may be prudent to consider that there is a Red Flag indicating a high risk of illegal diversion of EAR items any time you do business with any ZTE company. In its original action against ZTE, BIS published documents showing how ZTE constructed a network of entities to hide illegal shipments to Iran. In the case of ZTE, the illegal diversion scheme was not limited to the actions of a few unscrupulous sales people but involved senior ZTE officials creating a complex system, which may demonstrate that ZTE policy has been to make significant efforts to hide intentional violations of US trade controls.

It is unusual for BIS to publish such documents that show the evidence and background of illegal actions.  Without a doubt, everyone now knows that ZTE, at a high level, has taken extensive actions both to intentionally violate US trade controls and to hide its violations. So, now that you know it, thanks to BIS publishing evidence, it can be argued that you should presume there is a significant risk of ZTE illegally diverting the items it gets from you to unauthorized countries or recipients (e.g., the two ZTE entities that remain on the Entity List).  If there is a Red Flag that indicates a risk that ZTE will illegally divert the items it gets from you, that means that you should exercise more than average due diligence for your transfers of items controlled by the EAR to any ZTE entity. That does not mean that you may not do business with ZTE, but it does mean it would be prudent to ask additional questions or obtain additional assurances in writing from ZTE to give you confidence that ZTE will not illegally transfer your items.

Is the ITAR is Unconstitutionally Vague?

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

A Washington, DC lawyer thinks so and filed suit against the US Department of State. Matthew A. Goldstein, whose law practice focuses on International Trade, filed a suit in Federal Court after a 2013 Interim Final Rule was unclear on whether or not some lawyers’ activities fall within the regulatory definition of “brokering activities” because “export compliance advice frequently includes advice on how to structure transactions involving sales of defense articles and assistance in the preparation of contracts and other documents for such transactions.” As a lawyer, if Goldstein was considered to be a “broker” he would be required by the ITAR to disclose violations; this however would cause him to violate the District of Columbia Rule of Professional Conduct (attorney/client privilege).

After the rule was published in the Federal Register Goldstein sent a letter to Daniel Cook, the Directorate’s Chief of the Compliance, Registration, and Enforcement Division requesting the following guidance on what would be considered “brokering activities”:

  1. Advising how to structure transactions involving the sale of defense articles and defense services, to include advising how to structure sales, mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures that involve the transfer of defense articles and defense services;
  2. Preparing contracts for the sale of defense articles and defense services, to include clauses, parts, and other provisions to contracts, as well as letters of intent, nondisclosure, and other documents incidental to contracts for sale, mergers, acquisitions, and divestitures;
  3. Advising on and preparing technical assistance agreements and other Part 124 agreements, to include advising on how to structure the involvement of subcontractors, sub-licensees, and other parties to Part 124 agreements;
  4. Advising on the availability of financing for export sales of defense articles and defense services, and preparation of legal documents required by financial institutions for financing of export sales of defense articles and defense services;
  5. Advising on proposals to broker and sell defense articles and defense services and preparing proposals and clauses, parts, and other provisions to proposals; and
  6. Corresponding and meeting with U.S. government personnel regarding licensing policy and specific requests to export defense articles and defense services.

A year later Cook and Goldstein communicated via phone where Goldstein claims that Cook advised that, “so long as no fee arrangements are {made} on a commission or contingency basis,’ the “legal services described in Goldstein’s request are not subject to Part 129.” Months later Goldstein received a letter from Cook stating that the conversation that they had, “lacked sufficient detail for the Department to make an official determination as to whether the activities discussed constituted brokering activities.” Goldstein then filed suit a few days later on March 5, 2015.

Last month the Federal Court dismissed the case. Read all of the details at: https://goldsteinpllc.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/25-1-def-mtd-points-authorities.pdf

BIS Releases Data Portal

Tuesday, January 19th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Last month BIS launched its Data Portal which will provide access to data related licensing, controlled trade with select countries, ECR and a few more topics (see links below). This is the first time that BIS has made this type of information public, after looking at it, it is basic statistical information. For example, you can see that the percentage of AES Records in Compliance with the EAR has remained at 99% since 2010 or you can see the Statistical Analysis of US Trade with China in 2014. Happy data mining!

The Portal features statistical papers and datasets on:
Exporter Compliance
Controlled Trade with Select Countries
Export Control Reform (ECR)
BIS Licensing
U.S. Defense Industrial Base Analysis

Who creates this information?

The Office of Technology Evaluation (OTE) analyzes U.S. export data from the Census Automated Export System (AES) and BIS license application data to inform export policy decisions.

Our analysis primarily covers dual-use Commerce Control List (CCL) items which have both a civilian and military or proliferation-related end-use. Included are licensed, license exception, and unlicensed export transactions subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR). In addition, OTE assesses BIS license applications, including approved, denied and returned determinations.

OTE uses the findings from its analysis to educate industry at AES seminars on proper reporting of items subject to the EAR in the AES.

Have questions or comments?  Send us an email: data@bis.doc.gov.

Oy, 521! X-Ray Stealth Now EAR Controlled and More Changes on Wing Folding Systems

Friday, December 4th, 2015 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Oy, another 521!  On November 16, 2015 BIS added XBS Epoxy System to the List of 0Y521 Series. The Epoxy system is designed to obfuscate critical technology components against X-ray and terahertz microscopy imaging attempts.  This seems to be the stuff that you could spray on that oversized jug of body cream or your Swiss army knife so they would not be detected by airport x-ray machines.  Oy, TSA!

The 0Y521 Series was established in April 2012 for items for which there is no ECCN but that should be controlled for export because they provided at least a significant military or intelligence advantage to the US, or because foreign policy reasons justify its control.  0Y521 controls are temporary controls that allow BIS to impose controls on a temporary basis while it sorts things out—including making sure the controls are justified and attempting to get other countries to impose similar export controls.

This rule classifies XBS Epoxy System (ECCN 0C521) to be controlled for regional stability (RS) Column 1 reasons. The only license exception available for these items is for exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country) made by or consigned to a department or agency of the US Government. The license requirements and policies for ECCN 0Y521 series appear in § 742.6(a)(7) of the EAR.

License applications for this item may be submitted through SNAP–R in accordance with § 748.6 of the EAR. Exporters are directed to include detailed descriptions and technical specifications with the license application, and identify the item as 0C521.

In this rule, BIS has also removed technology and software related to aircraft wing folding systems from the 0Y521 Series List. The following changes have been made:

  • Entries No. 3 0D521 and No. 2 0E521, respectively, in Supplement No. 5 to part 774 are obsolete because, in accordance with procedure established in the April 13, 2012, final rule, the U.S. Government adopted a control through the relevant multilateral regime(s), which determined an appropriate longer-term control over the item. The wing fold system ‘‘software’’ is now controlled by ECCN 9D001, and the ‘‘technology’’ is controlled by ECCN 9E003.j on the CCL

As always, BIS is encouraging you to submit your comments on these changes.  You may submit comments by any of the following methods:

  • Federal eRulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov. The identification number for this rulemaking is BIS– 2015–0043.
  • By email directly to: publiccomments@bis.doc.gov. Include RIN 0694–AG70 in the subject line.
  • By mail or delivery to Regulatory Policy Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department of Commerce, Room 2099B, 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230. Refer to RIN 0694–AG70.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Michael Rithmire, Electronics and Materials Division, Office of National Security and Technology Transfer Controls by phone at (202) 482–6105 or by email at Michael.Rithmire@bis.doc.gov.