Archive for the ‘Denied & Restricted Parties’ Category

Rosoboronexport Added to Nonproliferation Act by State

Thursday, May 11th, 2017 by Danielle McClellan

On March 21, 2017, the Department of State applied the measures authorized in Section 3 of the Iran, North Korea, and Syria Nonproliferation Act against Rosoboronexport (ROE) (Russia) and any successor, sub-unit, or subsidiary thereof. The measures below will remain in place for two years from the effective date unless the Secretary of State determines otherwise.

Rosoboronexport accounts for more than 90% of Russia’s annual arms sales and India is their major client, other leading clients include China, Algeria, Syria, Vietnam, Venezuela and recently Iraq.

Section 3 of the Act, imposes the following measures against Rosoboronexport:

  1. No department or agency of the United States Government may procure or enter into any contract for the procurement of any goods, technology, or services from this foreign person, except to the extent that the Secretary of State otherwise may determine. This measure shall not apply to subcontracts at any tier with ROE and any successor, sub-unit, or subsidiary thereof made on behalf of the United States Government for goods, technology, and services for the maintenance, repair, overhaul, or sustainment of Mi-17 helicopters for the purpose of providing assistance to the security forces of Afghanistan, as well as for the purpose of combating terrorism and violent extremism globally. Moreover, the ban on U.S. government procurement from the Russian entity Rosoboronexport (ROE) and any successor, sub-unit, or subsidiary thereof shall not apply to United States Government procurement of goods, technology, and services for the purchase, maintenance, or sustainment of the Digital Electro Optical Sensor OSDCAM4060 to improve the U.S. ability to monitor and verify Russia’s Open Skies Treaty compliance. Such subcontracts include the purchase of spare parts, supplies, and related services for these purposes;
  2. 2. No department or agency of the United States Government may provide any assistance to this foreign person, and this person shall not be eligible to participate in any assistance program of the United States Government, except to the extent that the Secretary of State otherwise may determine;
  3. No United States Government sales to this foreign person of any item on the United States Munitions List are permitted, and all sales to this person of any defense articles, defense services, or design and construction services under the Arms Export Control Act are terminated; and;
  4. No new individual licenses shall be granted for the transfer to this foreign person of items the export of which is controlled under the Export Administration Act of 1979 or the Export Administration Regulations, and any existing such licenses are suspended.

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-03-29/pdf/2017-06224.pdf

Man Pleads Guilty to Stealing Sensitive Military Documents from United Technologies and Exporting Them to China

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Yu Long, 38, a citizen of China and permanent resident of the US, plead guilty on December 19, 2016 to one count of conspiracy to engage in the theft of trade secrets as well as one count of unlawful export and attempted export of defense articles from the US. Long worked as a Senior Engineer/Scientist at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) from May 2008 to May 2014 where he worked on F119 and F135 engines. During this time Long always intended to return to China to work on research projects at state-run universities in China using the knowledge and materials he was acquiring at UTRC. During 2013 and 2014, Long was recruited by Shenyang Institute of automation (SIA), of China, where he substantiated claims that he could provide documents from his work at UTRC and examples of projects on which he worked.

On May 30, 2014, Long left URTC and began travelling back and forth between the US and China with a UTRC external hard drive that he unlawfully retained after his employment ended. On November 7, 2014, Long was arrested, two days after he attempted to board a plane to China with sensitive, proprietary and export controlled documents from Rolls Royce, not URTC. His checked baggage was inspected by CBP officer in Newark, NJ, where the hard drive was found with all of the proprietary, export controlled information.

After his digital media was seized it was found that he had voluminous files protected by the ITAR and EAR, as well as files proprietary to UTRC, Pratt, and Rolls Royce. UTRC confirmed that the hard drive that he stole and accessed in China contained not only documents and data from projects long worked on, but also from projects that he did not work on. It was found that he obtained Pratt and Rolls Royce proprietary information from a project that the US Air Force had convened a consortium of major defense contractors to work together to see if they could collectively lower the costs of specific metals used.

A sentencing date has not been set but Long faces a maximum term of imprisonment for 15 years for the theft of trade secrets charge and 20 years of imprisonment for violated the Arms Export Act.

More Information: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/chinese-national-admits-stealing-sensitive-military-program-documents-united-technologies

Lebanon Company Fined $450,000 for Reexporting Items to Syria

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Tecnoline SAL (Tecnoline )of Sin El Fil, Beirut, Lebanon pled guilty to 7 charges of Causing, Aiding, or Abetting a Violation of the Regulations and will pay a civil penalty of $450,000. Tecnoline reexported US-origin mass spectrometers, gas chromatographs and consumables, liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer systems, and liquid chromatograph modules (ECCN 3A999), controlled for anti-terrorism reasons, to Syria. There is a long standing US Embargo against Syria which makes a BIS license required for all exports/reexports subject to the EAR with the only exception being food and certain medicines).

The items were manufactured by Agilent Technologies (Agilent), a US company, and Technoline was an authorized distributor and reseller of Agilent’s products. In 2004, Technoline signed an agreement with Agilent that acknowledged their awareness of US export control laws and regulations and agreed to comply with them as a reseller and distributor of controlled products. Between August 2009 and October 2010, Technoline negotiated price discounts on the items with Agilent and eventually ordered the items for the Syrian Government ministries or entities. Technoline falsely identified the ultimate destination of the items as being Iraq or Lebanon (BIS license not required) and on one or more occasions they failed to disclose the ultimate destination of the items. Agilent shipped the items to TEchnoline in Beirut, Lebanon via Agilent’s German subsidiary. Once Technoline received the items they transferred them to Syria, there they were installed at Syrian Government ministries within a month or so. There were never any authorizations from BIS to export the items from the US to Syria, or to reexport them from Germany to Syria.

View Order: https://efoia.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/export-violations/export-violations-2015/1080-e2474/file

Pakistani National Extradited and Sentenced to 33 Months in Prison for Conspiracy to Export Gyroscopes to Pakistan

Wednesday, October 12th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Syed Vaqar Ashraf (71) of Lahore, Pakistan (also known as Vaqar A. Jaffrey) was sentenced to 33 months in prison after being extradited from Belgium on July 31, 2015. According to court documents, in June 2012 Ashraf began asking a Tucson-based company, who shall remain nameless, for price quotes for unmanned aerial vehicles (drones). The company specializes in the design, development, and manufacturing of drones for the US military. The company immediately tipped off Homeland Security Investigations (HIS) agents about Ashraf’s requests.  HSI quickly assigned special agents to work undercover as employees of the Tucson-based company and they began dialoging with Ashraf directly.

From June 2012 to August 2014, Ashraf negotiated with special agents. He represented himself as the head of I&E International, based in Lahore, Pakistan.  Most of the correspondence was done via email where he agreed to purchase 18 gyroscopes that were intended to help medium-sized drones fly longer distances as well as 10 optical receiver modules and laser diodes intended to be installed in the aircraft for approximately $440,000.

In September 2013, HSI agents met with Ashraf in Vienna, Austria to work out details regarding the sale. Ashraf explained during the meeting that Pakistan’s nuclear program had been developed using technology exported from the west without a license. This led the agents to believe that Ashraf was working for Pakistan’s Advanced Engineering Research Organization and the intended use for the electronics was for the Pakistani military UAV program.

From January to March 2014 Ashraf asked agents for suggestions to get around the US export controls after agents requested a license from the Commerce Department and were told that the items would require a special license because the optical receive modules could be used in “activities related to nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons or missile delivery systems.” Ashraf asked if there were any alternative descriptions that would appear to cover the items on documents, but would clear arms control hurdles from State and Commerce departments.  Secret agents offered Ashraf with a few different descriptions and asked him if the customer was aware that transaction was “being done without a license.” Ashraf told the agents that they (customer) were “absolutely aware of everything.” Later in an email, Ashraf wrote, “He (customer) is well aware that he cannot get these gyros in a normal way; he’s well aware of that.” The ultimate plan was to transship all of the items; they would be shipped to Pakistan through Belgium.

HIS agents met with Ashraf three more times in face-to-face meetings, including one in the US where they agreed on a series of wire transfers, including one for $67,000. On August 26, 2014 agents set up a final meeting with Ashraf in Belgium to deliver some of the technology. Before the meeting began Belgian police showed up and arrested Ashraf. A little less than a year later Ashraf was extradited to the US to face trial on charges of conspiracy to export defense controlled items without a license which he later pled guilty to.

Read more: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/pakistani-national-extradited-and-sentenced-attempting-export-sensitive-technology-pakistani

BIS Extends Temporary General License for ZTE Entities

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

On March 24, 2016, a final rule was published that created a temporary general license that allowed, for a short time period, two entities (ZTE Corporation and ZTE Kangxun) that had been added to the Entity List on March 8, 2016, to be able to take part in exports, reexports, and transfers (in- country).

BIS has decided to extend the temporary general license until November 28, 2016. Due to this extension, the final rule will remove the date of August 30, 2016 and substitute the newest expiration date of November 28, 2016. No other changes have been made to the license.

Federal Register Notice: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-08-19/pdf/2016-19828.pdf

Screen Your Parties’ Addresses & Screen Before Shipments: Experienced and Sophisticated Company Fined $90,000 for One Export of EAR99 Item

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Spectrolab is an experienced and sophisticated exporter, according to BIS’s Order related to the illegal export of a Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (EAR99).  You may be thinking, EAR99 items don’t need a license so how is there an illegal export, but as the title states…screening is important and will find violations that otherwise are not obvious to the naked eye.

In this case, Spectrolab sold and transferred a Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator to a party on the Entity List in Pakistan. SUPARCO (Pakistan’s Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission) was added to the list in 1999 after it was found that they were involved in nuclear or missile activities. SUPARCO used a procurement agent to obtain the simulator from Spectrolab in 2014. Initially the agent said the item was for Pakistan’s Institute of Space Technology (IST) but soon after Spectrolab was made aware that SUPARCO was involved in the transaction. The procurement agent provided Spectrolab with the names and every party involved in the transaction except SUPARCO. Spectrolab screened the names, but not the addresses that they received from the agent which would have alerted them that SUPARCO was on the Entity List as their address was listed as IST.

Spectrolab even hosted an inspection and training session on installation and operation with an engineer from SUPARCO. The engineer even attended the training wearing a SUPARCO badge. As a result, Spectrolab was fully aware that SUPARCO was the end user of the simulator before they ever exported it. Spectrolab failed to run or re-run its screening software to screen either the SUPARCO name or address in connection with the final shipment, a direct contradiction of their own export compliance plan.

There were a few things that went wrong in this case for Spectrolab:

  1. They didn’t screen the companies address; if this was initially done the entire process would have stopped before it even started. BIS noted in the Order that Spectrolab used an export control screening software.
  2. No one raised the question of why the engineer worked for SUPARCO instead of IST or why the end user was SUPARCO instead of IST. This is really where the break down occurred
  3. They didn’t re-run their screening software before shipping the item to Pakistan

The biggest take away from this case is to screen everything about your customers, and that the government expects you to catch on to oddities related to your shipments. In this case, the company name changing, it’s not surprising that no one knew that SUPARCO was on the Entity List, there’s thousands on that list. The issue is that there was a red flag with SUPARCO coming into the transaction but not being listed on the documents. Entities who are on the denial list will be sneaky, and BIS expects you to catch that…that just didn’t happen in this case.

Order:  https://efoia.bis.doc.gov/index.php/electronic-foia/index-of-documents/7-electronic-foia/227-export-violations

China Telecomm Giant ZTE Gets Another Temporary Reprieve from US Export Denial List

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: John Black

The Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) announced that it is extending the temporary general license for ZTE to effectively suspend ZTE’s denial list status until August 30, 2016.  BIS originally put ZTE on its Entity List on March 8, 2016, based on BIS’ allegations that ZTE, including its senior management, established a complex network as part of its efforts to illegally transfer US technology to Iran and other prohibited destinations.  The original denial prohibited all transfers from anywhere in the world of US origin items to ZTE as well as exports from outside the United States of non-US origin items with more than 25% US controlled content and certain foreign items produced directly from using US technology.  The original listing was clearly the biggest EAR penalty ever imposed in my 32 years in this field.

As previously reported in this newsletter, on March 24, 2016 BIS announced a general license that effectively temporarily suspended until June 30, 2016, the denial  against:

  • Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment (ZTE) Corporation (also referred to as ZTEC)
  • ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd.

Now BIS has extended that general license for these two entities through August 31, 2016.  It is easy to infer from this that ZTE must have originally refused to cooperate with BIS regarding the diversions to prohibited destinations, but after being placed on the Entity List ZTE rounded up a hoard of Washingotn lawyers and came crawling on its knees to BIS promising to cooperate and take decisive remedial actions.  The extension indicates that ZTE is continuing to cooperate with BIS, at least as much as is necessary to get the suspension of its denial extended until the end of August.

These two ZTE entities remain on the EAR Entity List:

  • Beijing 8 Star International Co.
  • ZTE Parsian

For more information go to:  http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/regulations/federal-register-notices#fr41799

Export Business Manager Pleads Guilty to Attempted Illegal Exports to Iran

Friday, May 27th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Asim Fareed (age 51) of North Brunswick, NJ operated an export business in Somerset, NJ that agreed to ship items purchased by customers in Iran. Fareed provided false documentation to the US Department of Commerce for export purposes between 2013 and 2015. He created invoices that contained false information related to the identity and geographic location of the purchasers of the goods. The items were supposed to be shipped from the US to the UAE and then onto Iran. The items never were actually shipped.

Asim Fareed agreed to enter a plea to conspiracy to provide false statements in connection to the illegal export of goods to Iran. “The Office of Export Enforcement vigorously pursues violators of our nation’s export control laws, which are in place to further and protect our national security and foreign policy.  As in this instance, we work closely with our colleagues at HSI and other law enforcement agencies in prosecuting this case,” said Jonathan Carson, Special Agent in Charge, U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security, Office of Export Enforcement, New York Field Office.
“This case demonstrates how far individuals will go to circumvent U.S. export laws to export goods to countries like the Islamic Republic of Iran,” said Angel M. Melendez, special agent in charge of HSI in New York. “The Iran Trade Embargo prohibits Americans from supplying goods, technology and services to Iran directly or indirectly. HSI is committed to aggressively pursuing those who conduct illegal business with Iran.”
The case was investigated by the Department of Commerce, Office of Export Enforcement and U.S. Immigration and Custom Enforcement’s (ICE), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).  Assistant U.S. Attorney Todd K. Hinkley is prosecuting the case.
More information: https://www.justice.gov/usao-mdpa/pr/new-jersey-man-charged-conspiracy-provide-false-statements-related-export-prohibited

It Never Pays to Use Your Church to Cover Your Export Violations

Thursday, May 5th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

What does a system analyst for a defense contractor, a church volunteer and an owner of 3 US companies all have in common?  They all involve one woman, who will now spend 57 months in prison, encompassed each, and all at the same time. Hannah Robert, of North Burnswick, New Jersey recently plead guilty to conspiring to violate the Arms Export Act by exporting military technical drawings to India without government approval.

The story begins with Robert being an employee for a defense contractor where she worked as a system analyst and had access to thousands of export controlled drawings that were used for bids on US Department of Defense (DoD) contracts (Robert held this position until November 2012). In June 2010, she became the founder, owner and president of One Source USA LLC where she contracted with the DoD to supply defense hardware items and spare parts. In September 2012, Robert opened another defense company, Caldwell Components, Inc. as well as Once Source India (located in India), with a resident of India (identified on as R.P. in court documents) that manufactured defense hardware items and spare parts.

Between June 2010 and December 2012 Robert illegally exported defense technical drawings for parts used in the torpedo systems for nuclear submarines, military attack helicopters and F-15 fighter aircraft to R.P. in India. Robert and her India counterpart also sold defense hardware items to foreign customers including the United Arab Emirates Ministry of Defence. Hannah Robert volunteered at a church in Camden County, New Jersey, as a web administrator. This allowed her access to the church’s website where she uploaded the defense technical data. She provided her login and password to the church’s website to R.P. so that he/she could download the files. This process went on for two years and was the way in which Robert and R.P. were able to pass the technical information amongst themselves.

Hannah Robert was also faced with the issue of providing US DoD with faulty wing pins for the F-15 fighter aircraft. Robert provided false and misleading material certificates and inspection reports for the parts. The documents also failed to list that the actual manufacturer of the pins was located in India, not One Source USA’s New Jersey location which was listed on all of her DoD bids. The failed wing pins grounded approximately 47 F-15 fighter aircraft and cost DoD over $150,000 to inspect and repair the pins. Robert must pay $181,000 to the DoD to cover the repair costs as well as forfeiting more than $77,000 that she earned from the contracts.

The case was investigated by the special agents of the Defense Criminal Investigative Service’s Northeast Field Office and the special agents of the Department of Homeland Security’s Counter Proliferation Investigations.

More Information: https://www.justice.gov/usao-nj/pr/former-owner-defense-contracting-businesses-sentenced-57-months-prison-illegally

China’s ZTE Added to BIS Entity List: The Impact on ZTE, US and Non-US Companies

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Douglas N. Jacobson, Esq., Jacobson Burton Kelly PLLC, djacobson@jacobsonburton.com, 202-431-2407

Editor’s Note: See the article above for a March 24, 2016 update for the status of two of the ZTE entities.  This article is included here because it provides excellent information and insight regarding the original action.
The Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security published a notice on March 8, 2016 in the Federal Register (reprinted below) announcing that China’s ZTE Corporation (ZTE or ZTEC), and three of its affiliates, have been added to the Entity List.

Founded in 1985 and headquartered in Shenzhen China, ZTE, whose shares are traded on the Shenzhen, China and Hong Kong stock exchanges, is China’s second largest telecommunications company. ZTE is also the world’s seventh largest producer of smartphones and has operations in the US and more than 160 other countries. ZTE has annual revenues of more than $12 billion per year.

ZTE is being added to the BIS Entity List for allegedly reexporting US origin products to sanctioned countries, including Iran, and for planning “a scheme to establish, control, and use a series of “detached” (i.e., shell) companies to evade US export controls.
This action, which comes after a four-year investigation of ZTE by BIS’s Office of Export Enforcement and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, will have a major impact on ZTE and US and non-US companies.

BIS Entity List

The BIS Entity List, found at Part 744 of the US Export Administration Regulations (EAR), includes non-US businesses, research institutions, government and private organizations, individuals, and other types of legal persons, that are subject to specific license requirements for the export, reexport and/or transfer (in-country) of specified items. Parties are added to the Entity List by BIS when there is an increased risk of diversion of US-origin items or where the parties engaged in activities contrary to U.S. national security and/or foreign policy interests. BIS has been using the BIS more frequently in the past few years.

Specific entries on the Entity List identify the items that are subject to a license requirement and BIS’s licensing policy regarding any license applications that are submitted.

Parties Added to Entity List and Licensing Requirements
As a result of BIS’s action, which takes effect immediately, BIS will impose a license requirement for all persons and companies, wherever located, to export, reexport or transfer to “all items subject to the EAR” to the following four companies:

  1. Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment (ZTE) Corporation (also referred to as ZTEC)Address: ZTE Plaza, Keji Road South, Hi-Tech Industrial Park, Nanshan District, Shenzhen, China;
  2. Beijing 8 Star International Co. Address: Unit 601, 6thFloor, Tower 1, Prosper Center, No. 5, Guanghua Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China;
  3. ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd. Address: 2/3 Floor, Suite A, Zte Communication Mansion Keji (S) Road, Hi-New Shenzhen, 518057 China
  4. ZTE Parsian. Address No. 100, Africa Ave., Mirdamad Entersection [sic], Tehran, Iran.

The license review policy for all four entities is “presumption of denial”, meaning that is not likely that BIS will approve any license applications to these four parties.

Because the license requirement for all four companies applies to all “items subject to the EAR”, as defined in section 734.3 of the EAR, a license will be required to export, reexport or transfer all US-origin goods, software or technology, wherever located, whether classified as EAR99 or listed on the Commerce Control list (i.e., identified with an ECCN number, such as ECCN 3A001).
This will also have an impact on non-US companies because the license requirement will also apply to any item produced outside the US and sold to the four ZTE entities that incorporates US-origin parts, components, software if the total value of the controlled US content exceeds the de minimis level in section 734.4 of the EAR (e.g., 25% for reexports to China).

Impact on ZTE and US and non-US companies

This action will have a major impact on ZTE and many US companies as it has been estimated that ZTE sources more than 40% of its parts and components from US suppliers. As a result of  ZTE’s size and international footprint, US and non-US companies should immediately screen their customer databases to make sure that ZTE is flagged as a party subject to Entity List restrictions and that any shipments be stopped. While the BIS notice contains a “savings clause” for certain items that were already en route aboard a carrier to ZTE, there is no “grandfathering” of items that had been ordered but have not been shipped.

Unlike parties included on OFAC’s SDN List, the addition of ZTE to the Entity List does not prohibit US or non-US persons from engaging in financial transactions with ZTE or require that any of the listed companies’ assets be frozen. Rather, BIS is restricting the export, reexport or transfer of any goods, technology, or software to these ZTE companies. Also, unlike OFAC, BIS does not control the export of services to a listed party. However, the term “technology” is broadly defined in the EAR to include certain types of information, including specific information necessary for operation, maintenance, repair, overhaul and refurbishing of items subject to the EAR.

In addition, BIS does not have a 50% rule that applies to companies owned by the four ZTE companies listed. BIS has stated that the licensing requirements imposed on a listed entity by virtue of its being listed do not per se apply to its subsidiaries, sister companies, or other legally distinct affiliates that are not listed on the Entity List. However, BIS has also stated that if affiliates of the listed company act as an agent, a front, or a shell company for the listed entity in order to facilitate transactions that would not otherwise be permissible with the listed entity, then the company is likely violating General Prohibition 10 and other provisions of the EAR. Therefore, exporters are encouraged to take extra steps in an effort to make sure that items are not ultimately destined for the listed entities.

Reasons for Adding ZTE to Entity List

The Federal Register notice specifies that ZTE was added to the BIS Entity List because it reexported controlled US origin items to Iran in violation of US law. In addition, BIS noted that the company created an internal document entitled: “Proposal for Import and Export Control Risk Avoidance” describing how ZTE planned and organized a scheme to use a series of shell companies to reexport controlled items to Iran in violation of US export control laws.

In an unusual move, BIS published on its website documents obtained during its investigation of ZTE to support its findings. These documents, which are published below, are very thorough and read like a playbook on how to circumvent US export controls.

These documents, which were posted by BIS in their original Mandarin and translated English versions, provide detailed information on ZTE’s understanding of how US export control laws applied to them and the repercussions if they were unable to continue with their work in the US sanctions countries, including Iran, Sudan, North Korea, Cuba and Syria. The documents even included a summary of the enforcement actions that could be taken against the company, including listing the US supply chain, and provided examples of prior export control issues the company had faced, and recent enforcement cases brought against other Chines companies. The documents show that ZTE tried to attract members to its export control team by paying a bonus.

For example, the “Proposal for Import and Export Control Risk Avoidance” describes how ZTE planned to establish and use “detached” (i.e., shell) companies and other measures to avoid “risks of import and export control”. The document suggests that the company use the Jebel Ali Free Zone in Dubai as the “primary choice” to locate one of the companies. The document also describes ways to properly handle and pack the goods to minimize the risks to ZTE.

Repercussions

Because ZTE is a major telecommunications company the addition of ZTE to the Entity List has already had ripple effects. ZTE’s stock has been suspended from trading on the Hong Kong and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges and China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs denounced the BIS actions in the following statement:
“The Chinese side is firmly opposed to the US using domestic laws to place sanctions on Chinese companies. The Chinese side urges the US side to call off the wrong action lest it should jeopardize economic cooperation and relationship between China and the US.”

Representative Eliot L. Engel (D-NY), Ranking Member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, called for further sanctions on ZTE in the following statement:

“Today’s (March 8, 2016) action to impose a virtual embargo on exports to China’s number-two telecom company, ZTE, reveals publicly for the first time that this company has systematically violated U.S. sanctions on Iran, North Korea, and other proscribed countries. ZTE bought U.S. telecom equipment and illegally incorporated it into communications systems for the Iranian and North Korean security, military, and intelligence agencies. I commend the federal agents at the Commerce Department, FBI, and Homeland Security Department for carrying out this four-year investigation. Additional criminal charges are likely to be brought. I believe that the U.S. sanctions should be extended to cut off all ZTE commercial activity and investment in the United States.”

It has been widely reported that BIS and the FBI commenced an investigation on ZTE’s compliance with US export control laws in 2012. It has also been reported that senior ZTE executives have not traveled to the US over the past few years for fear of being arrested.

Given the activities described in the ZTE documents and the language in the Entity List notice, it appears likely that ZTE will remain in the crosshairs of the US Government for some time to come.