Archive for the ‘BIS’ Category

BIS revises License Exceptions Related to Cuba

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

This rule amends a license exception to allow cargo aboard aircraft to transit Cuba when that cargo is bound for destinations other than Cuba. This rule also authorizes export and reexport of certain items sold directly to individuals in Cuba under a license exception. Finally, this rule revises the lists of ineligible Cuban officials for purposes of certain license exceptions. BIS is publishing this rule to further implement the administration’s policy of increasing engagement and commerce that benefits the Cuban people.

This final ruling is in conjunctions with OFAC (Office of Foreign Assets Controls) recent amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) (31CRF Part 515). Although the changes below revise the licensing policy for certain types of exports, the United States continues to maintain a comprehensive embargo on trade with Cuba. The export and reexport to Cuba of all items subject to the EAR still requires a BIS license, unless authorized by a license exception specified in §746.2(a)(1) of the EAR or exempted from license requirements in §746.2(a)(2) of the EAR.

The following changes will be made:

PART 740

  • Section 740.12 is amended by revising paragraphs (a)(2)(v)(A) and (B) to read as follows: § 740.12    Gift parcels and humanitarian donations (GFT).

(a) *  *  *

(2) *  *  *

(v) *  *  *

(A) No gift parcel may be sent to any member of the Council of Ministers or flag officer of the Revolutionary Armed Forces.

(B) No gift parcel may be sent to any member of the Politburo.

  • Section 740.15 is amended by revising the introductory text and paragraph (d)(6), removing the second (duplicate) ‘‘note to paragraph (d),’’ redesignating paragraph (e) as paragraph (f), and adding a new paragraph (e) to read as follows:
    • § 740.15    Aircraft, vessels and spacecraft (AVS). This License Exception authorizes departure from the United States of foreign registry civil aircraft on temporary sojourn in the United States and of U.S. civil aircraft for temporary sojourn abroad; the export of equipment and spare parts for permanent use on a vessel or aircraft; exports to vessels or planes of U.S. or Canadian registry and U.S. or Canadian Airlines’ installations or agents; the export or reexport of cargo that will transit Cuba on an aircraft or vessel on temporary sojourn; and the export of spacecraft and components for fundamental research. Generally, no License Exception symbol is necessaryfor export clearance purposes; however, when necessary, the symbol ‘‘AVS’’ may be used.
    •  (d) *  *  *
    • (6) Cuba, eligible vessels and purposes. Only the types of vessels listed in this paragraph (d)(6) departing for Cuba for the purposes listed in this paragraph (d)(6) may depart for Cuba pursuant to this paragraph (d). Vessels used to transport both passengers and items to Cuba may transport automobiles only if the export or reexport of the automobiles to Cuba has been authorized by a separate license issued by BIS (i.e., not authorized by license exception).
    • (i) Cargo vessels for hire for use in the transportation of items;
    • (ii) Passenger vessels for hire for use in the transportation of passengers and/ or items; and
    • (iii) Recreational vessels that are used in connection with travel authorized by the Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).
    • Note to paragraph (d)(6)(iii): Readers should also consult U.S. Coast Guard regulations at 33 CFR part 107 Subpart B— Unauthorized Entry into Cuban Territorial Waters.
    • (e) Intransit cargo. Cargo laden on board an aircraft or vessel may transit Cuba provided:
      • (1) The aircraft or vessel is exported or reexported on temporary sojourn to Cuba pursuant to paragraph (a) or (d) of this section or a license from BIS; and
      • (2) The cargo departs with the aircraft or vessel at the end of its temporary sojourn to Cuba, is not removed from the aircraft or vessel for use in Cuba and is not transferred to another aircraft or vessel while in Cuba.

 

  • Section 740.19 is amended by revising paragraphs (c)(2)(i) and (ii) to read as follows: § 740.19    Consumer communications devices (CCD).
    •  (c) *  *  *
    • (2) *  *  *
    • (i) Ineligible Cuban Government Officials. Members of the Council of Ministers and flag officers of the Revolutionary Armed Forces.
    • (ii) Ineligible Cuban Communist Party Officials. Members of the Politburo.
  • Section 740.21 is amended by:
    • a. Removing the word ‘‘or’’ from the end of paragraph (b)(2);
    • b. Removing the period from the end of paragraph (b)(3) and adding in its place ‘‘; or’’;
    • c. Adding paragraph (b)(4) and;
    • d. Revising paragraphs (d)(4)(ii) and (iii).
    • The addition and revisions read as follows: § 740.21    Support for the Cuban People (SCP).
      •  (b) *  *  *
      • (4) Items sold directly to individuals in Cuba for their personal use or their immediate family’s personal use, other than officials identified in paragraphs (d)(4)(ii) or (iii) of this section.
      • (d) *  *  *
      • (4) *  *  *
      • (ii) Members of the Council of Ministers and flag officers of the Revolutionary Armed Forces; and
      • (iii) Members of the Politburo.
  • Section 746.2 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(1)(x) to read as follows:
    •  § 746.2    Cuba.
      • (a) *  *  *
      • (1) *  *  *
      • (x) Aircraft, vessels and spacecraft (AVS) for certain aircraft on temporary sojourn; equipment and spare parts for permanent use on a vessel or aircraft, and ship and plane stores; vessels on temporary sojourn; or cargo transiting Cuba on aircraft or vessels on temporary sojourn (see § 740.15(a), (b), (d), and (e) of the EAR).

Federal Register Notice: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-10-17/pdf/2016-25034.pdf

For additional information, please review the rule, the Department of Commerce and Department of the Treasury’s joint fact sheet, and BIS’s updated Frequently Asked Questions, For any specific questions regarding exports or reexports to Cuba, please contact the Foreign Policy Division at (202) 482-4252.

Lebanon Company Fined $450,000 for Reexporting Items to Syria

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Tecnoline SAL (Tecnoline )of Sin El Fil, Beirut, Lebanon pled guilty to 7 charges of Causing, Aiding, or Abetting a Violation of the Regulations and will pay a civil penalty of $450,000. Tecnoline reexported US-origin mass spectrometers, gas chromatographs and consumables, liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer systems, and liquid chromatograph modules (ECCN 3A999), controlled for anti-terrorism reasons, to Syria. There is a long standing US Embargo against Syria which makes a BIS license required for all exports/reexports subject to the EAR with the only exception being food and certain medicines).

The items were manufactured by Agilent Technologies (Agilent), a US company, and Technoline was an authorized distributor and reseller of Agilent’s products. In 2004, Technoline signed an agreement with Agilent that acknowledged their awareness of US export control laws and regulations and agreed to comply with them as a reseller and distributor of controlled products. Between August 2009 and October 2010, Technoline negotiated price discounts on the items with Agilent and eventually ordered the items for the Syrian Government ministries or entities. Technoline falsely identified the ultimate destination of the items as being Iraq or Lebanon (BIS license not required) and on one or more occasions they failed to disclose the ultimate destination of the items. Agilent shipped the items to TEchnoline in Beirut, Lebanon via Agilent’s German subsidiary. Once Technoline received the items they transferred them to Syria, there they were installed at Syrian Government ministries within a month or so. There were never any authorizations from BIS to export the items from the US to Syria, or to reexport them from Germany to Syria.

View Order: https://efoia.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/export-violations/export-violations-2015/1080-e2474/file

Save a Stamp…File Boycott- Related Requests Online Now

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Effective October 14, 2016 BIS has amended the EAR to permit electronic submission as an additional method available to US person for reporting requests they receive to take certain actions in furtherance or support of an unsanctioned foreign boycott.  The amendments are basically administrative changes to the EAR to permit electronic filing as opposed to only mail filings.

Prior to this rule, § 760.5(b)(4) and (5) of the EAR required United States persons to prepare reports of boycott- related requests on form BIS 621–P (single transaction) or on form BIS 6051–P (multiple transactions), both available on-line through the Office of Antiboycott Compliance (OAC) page of the BIS Web site (OAC Web page) in a fillable PDF format, and to submit the reports in duplicate paper copy to OAC postmarked by the last day of the month following the calendar quarter in which the request was received (or, if received outside the United States, by the last day of the second month following the calendar quarter in which the request was received).

While United States persons may continue to submit paper reports by mail consistent with §760.5(b)(4)— (b)(7), this final rule amends the EAR to allow submission of reports electronically, with the same deadlines, through the OAC Web page.

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-10-14/pdf/2016-24831.pdf

Information on both paper and electronic submissions is available through the OAC Web page at https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/enforcement/%20oac?id=300

USML Categories VIII, XII, and XV Amended and Some Items Shifting to CCL

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

The Department of State has published a final rule that will be effective December 31, 2016 that will revise Category XII (fire control, laser, imaging, and guidance equipment) of the U.S. Munitions List (USML) to remove certain items from control on the USML and to describe more precisely the articles continuing to warrant control on the USML. The Department of State also amends USML Categories VIII, XIII, and XV to reflect that items previously described in those Categories are now controlled under the revised Category XII or Commerce Control List. Further, the Department revises USML Category XI to move items to the CCL as a result of changes to related control in USML Category XII. The Export Administration Regulations (EAR) amends Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 7A611 and creates a new ‘‘600 series’’ ECCNs 7B611, 7D611, and 7E611. In addition, for certain dual-use infrared detection items, this final rule expands controls for certain software and technology, eliminates the use of some license exceptions, revises licensing policy, and expands license requirements for certain transactions involving military end users or foreign military commodities. This final rule also harmonizes provisions within the EAR by revising controls related to certain quartz rate sensors.

ITAR Changes Below:

Section 121.1 is amended by:

  • Removing and reserving paragraph (e) in U.S. Munitions List Category VIII;
  • Revising paragraphs (a)(3)(ii) and (a)(10) of U.S. Munitions List Category XI;
  • Revising U.S. Munitions List Category XII; Removing and reserving paragraph (a) in U.S. Munitions List Category XIII; and
  • Removing and reserving paragraph (c) in U.S. Munitions List Category XV

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-10-12/pdf/2016-24225.pdf

 

EAR Changes Below:

  • Part 734
    • Section 734.4 is amended by removing and reserving paragraph (a)(3) and revising paragraph (a)(5).
  • Part 740
    • Section 740.2 is amended by adding paragraph (a)(7) and removing and reserving paragraph (a)(9).
    • Section 740.16 is amended by revising paragraphs (a)(2) and (b)(1) through (3)
    • Section 740.20 is amended by revising paragraphs (b)(2)(ii) and (b)(2)(x)
  • Part 742
    • Section 742.6 is amended by revising paragraph (b)(1)
  • Part 744
    • Section 744.9 is amended by revising the section heading and paragraphs (a) and (b)
  • Part 772
    • Section 772.1 is amended by revising the last sentence in Note 1 to the definition of ‘‘specially designed’’
  • Part 774
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 0, ECCN 0A919 is amended by revising the Items paragraph of the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 0, ECCN 0A987 is amended by:
      • Revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section;
      • Revising paragraph f. in the Items paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section; and
      • Adding a note to 0A987.f
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 2, ECCN 2A984 is amended by revising the heading and Note 1 of the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A002 is amended by:
    • Removing the ‘‘Special Conditions for STA’’ section; and
    • Revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section.
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A003 is amended by:
      • Adding a License Requirement Note in the License Requirements section;
      • Revising notes 3 and 4 in the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section; and
      • Adding note 5 to the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A004 is amended by revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A005 is amended by revising the last two sentences in the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A007 is amended by revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A008 is amended by revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A107 is amended by revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A611 is revised
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A990 is revised
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6A993 is amended by revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled sectionn Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6D002 is amended by revising the TSR paragraph in the List Based License Exceptions section and the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6D003 is amended by revising the TSR paragraph in the List Based License Exceptions section and the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6D991 is revised
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6E001 is amended by revising the TSR paragraph in the List Based License Exceptions section and the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, ECCN 6E002 is amended by revising the TSR paragraph in the List Based License Exceptions section and the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 6, The following ECCNs will be amended by revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
      • ECCN 6E990
      • ECCN 7A001
      • ECCN 7A002
      • ECCN 7A003
      • ECCN 7A005
      • ECCN 7A101
      • ECCN 7A102
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 7, ECCN 7A611 is revised
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 7, ECCN 7A994 is revised
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 7, add ECCN 7B611 between ECCNs 7B103 and 7B994
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 7, add ECCN 7D611 between ECCNs 7D103 and 7D994
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 7, add ECCN 7E611 between ECCNs 7E104 and 7E994
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 7, ECCN 7E994 is amended by revising the Related Controls paragraphin the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 8, ECCN 8A002 is amended by adding a sentence to the end of the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section
    • In Supplement No. 1 to part 774, Category 9, ECCN 9A991 is amended by:
      • Removing the License Requirement Notes paragraph in the License Requirements section, and
      • Revising the Related Controls paragraph in the List of Items Controlled section.

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-10-12/pdf/2016-24220.pdf

Want a more detailed overview of these regulation changes? Our Export Control Reform for USML Category XII: Fire Control, Laser, Imaging, and Guidance Webinar will cover the following:

  • Significant changes to USML Category XII and corresponding revisions to Categories VIII, XI, XIII, and XV, which will result in some items moving off the USML
  • What the definition of “specially designed” really means for classification purposes, and how Category XII has introduced a new concept of “specially designed for a military end-user”
  • How to classify formerly ITAR-controlled items on the Commerce Control List, especially the new and revised “600 series” Export Control Classification Numbers (ECCNs) (7A611, 7B611, 7D611, and 7E611)
  • Adjustments to several related non-600 series ECCNs is CCL Categories 0, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 9
  • License exception eligibility for these items, including important changes to License Exceptions APR, GOV, and STA
  • Revisions to unique EAR military end use and end user controls
  • The actions exporters should take now to prepare for the rapidly approaching effective date of these changes

Learn More at: http://www.learnexportcompliance.com/Webinars/Export-Control-Reform-for-USML-Category-XII-Fire-C.aspx

EAR CCL Category 5 Part 2 Update List

Wednesday, October 12th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

BIS has published final rules implementing the Wassenaar Arrangement’s decision to re-write Category 5 Part 2, below is a list of updates. BIS will be updating their Encryption website soon to reflect these changes.

ECCN Changes to Category 5 Part 2

  • Separates C5P2 into 3 subsections:
    • Cryptographic information security
    • Non-cryptographic information security – 5A003
    • Defeating, Weakening, or bypassing information security – 5A004
  • Deletes ECCNS 5A992/5D992 a&b, as well as 5E992.a
  • Keeps mass market ECCNs 5A992/5D992.c and 5E992.b
  • Decontrol notes (Note to 5A002.a) moved around to remove previously unused paragraphs
  • Removes previous Note 1 to C5P2 – moved to a General Information Security Note (Supp. No. 2 to Part 774), removed all the pointers in the EAR to C5P2
  • Adds a sentence to the Note to Note 3 saying that simple price inquiry is not a consultation
  • Deletes 5A002 a.7 control on products above EAL-6

License Exception Changes

  • License Exception TSU – Publicly available source code is no longer subject to the EAR once the email notification is sent. The Notification requirement that was previously under TSU §740.13(e) is moved to §742.15(b)
  • License Exception TMP – 5E002 encryption technology now eligible for tools of the trade provisions under 740.9
  • §742.15 – Encryption Mass market provisions are moved from §742.15 to §740.17
  • License Exception ENC – §740.17
    • Paragraph (a)(1) – Adds an exception for certain related parties transactions for companies headquartered in a Supp. 3 country
    • §740.17(b)(4) – Deletes paragraph on short-range wireless items, paragraph on foreign made products is moved to paragraph (a)
    • Encryption Registrations no longer required – some of the information from the registration now goes into the Supp. No. 8 to Part 742 report
    • If an exporter submits a CCATS review for an item under §740.17(b)(1), it does NOT have to go on the self-classification report
    • §740.17(b)(2) – updates performance parameters
  • § Edits headers to make it clear that there should only be one parameter that applies to a product
  • § Aggregate encrypted throughput increased from 90 Mbps to 250 Mbps
  • § Deletes single channel input data rate
  • § Deletes 250 concurrent encrypted data channels
  • § Media parameter raised from 1,000 endpoints to 2,500
  • § Carves out for mass market satellite modems that use end-to-end encryption between the modem and the hub
  • § 5A002.d (channelizing codes) and 5A002.e (spread spectrum) moved to §740.17(b)(2)
  • § New authorization for network infrastructure items to less-sensitive government end-users.
  • Delets grandfathering provisions
  • Adds Croatia added to Supp. No. 3 to Part 740
  • Revises Supp. No. 6 to Part 742 questions
  • Definition of government end-user states that government-owned public schools and universities are “government end-users” as defined in Section 772
  • Adds definition of “More sensitive government end-users” and “Less-sensitive government end-users”

Note

Classifications issued for 5A992/5D992 a&b and 5E992.a prior to the elimination of these ECCNs may now be classified elsewhere (e.g., 5A991,) if applicable, or EAR99.

Mass market encryption authorizations issued under 742.15(b)(1) or (b)(3) prior to this rule change continue to be authorized under the newly located mass market encryption provisions found in 740.17(b)(1) and (b)(3), respectively. A new classification is NOT required merely because the item moved from 742.15 to 740.17.

Wassenaar Arrangement Ruling: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/09/20/2016-21544/wassenaar-arrangement-2015-plenary-agreements-implementation-removal-of-foreign-national-review

BIS Final Rule: http://www.bis.doc.gov/InformationSecurity2016-updates

The Last Hoorah for Reform?

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Over three years ago (April 2013) the first set of Export Control Reform regulations were published in the Federal Register, they were over 100 pages long and made the regulations more complex but also significantly relaxed controls on some items. Over the last few years reform has come in the form of waves and moved items from the USML onto the CCL in batches. Now, as the Obama Administration is moving out it looks as though we are about to see the last list shift for a while.

The final rule, which will be effective December 31, 2016, will move specific items controlled under Category XIV and Category XVIII. Basically, items that have been determined to no longer warrant ITAR control (toxicological agents, including chemical agents, biological agents, and associated equipment, along with directed energy weapons) will be controlled under the Commerce Control List (CCL). The affected Category XIV items consist of dissemination, detection, and protection “equipment” and related articles, such as production and test “equipment,” and will be controlled under new ECCNs 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, 1D607 and 1E607. The affected Category XVIII articles will follow in suit with being primarily tooling, production “equipment,” test and evaluation “equipment,” test models, and related articles and will be controlled under new ECCNs 6B619, 6D619, and 6E619.

Specific Regulation Changes:

ITAR:

  • This final rule adopts for those pathogens and toxins that meet specific capabilities listed in paragraph (b) the ‘‘Tier 1’’ pathogens and toxins established in the Department of Health and Human Services and the United States Department of Agriculture select agents and toxins regulations (42 CFR part 73 and 9 CFR part 121). The Tier 1 pathogens and toxins that do not meet these capabilities remain controlled in Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 1C351 on the CCL.
  • Additionally, this rule, in concert with the analogous rule published by the Department of Commerce, moves riot control agents to the export jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce, as well as the articles covered previously in paragraphs (j), (k), and (l), which include test facilities, equipment for the destruction of chemical and biological agents, and tooling for production of articles in paragraph (f), respectively.
  • Other changes include the addition of paragraph (a)(5) to control chemical warfare agents ‘‘adapted for use in war’’ and not elsewhere enumerated, as well as the removal of paragraphs (f)(3) and (f)(6) and movement to the CCL of equipment for the sample collection and decontamination or remediation of chemical agents and biological agents.
  • Paragraph (f)(5) for collective protection was removed and partially combined in paragraph (f)(4) or the CCL.
  • Paragraph (g) enumerates antibodies, recombinant protective antigens, polynucleotides, biopolymers, or biocatalysts exclusively funded by a Department of Defense contract for detection of the biological agents listed in paragraph (b)(1)(ii).
  • The Department notes that the controls in paragraph (f)(2) that include the phrase ‘‘developed under a Department of Defense contract or other funding authorization’’ do not apply when the Department of Defense acts solely as a servicing agency for a contract on behalf of another agency of the U.S. government. Moreover, ‘‘other funding authorization’’ refers to other funding authorization from the Department of Defense.
  • The Department notes that the controls in paragraphs (g)(1) and (h) that include the phrase ‘‘exclusively funded by a Department of Defense contract’’ do not apply when the Department of Defense acts solely as a servicing agency for a contract on behalf of another agency of the U.S. government, or, for example, in cases where the Department of Defense provides initial funding for the development of an item but another agency of the U.S. government provides funding to further develop or adapt the item.
  • Paragraph (h) enumerates certain vaccines funded exclusively by the Department of Defense, as well as certain vaccines controlled in (h)(4) that are specially designed for the sole purpose of protecting against biological agents and biologically derived substances identified in (b). Thus, the scope of vaccines controlled in (h)(4) is circumscribed by the nature of funding and the satisfaction of the term ‘‘specially designed’’ as that term is defined in ITAR § 120.41. In evaluating the scope of this control, please note that the Department offers a decision tool to aid exporters in determining whether a defense article meets the definition of ‘‘specially designed.’’ This tool is available at http://www.pmddtc.state.gov/licensing/dtSpeciallyDesigned.htm.
  • Paragraph (i) is updated to provide better clarity on the scope of the control by including examples of Department of Defense tools that are used to determine or estimate potential effects of chemical or biological weapons strikes and incidents in order to plan to mitigate their impacts.
  • A new paragraph (x) has been added to USML Category XIV, allowing ITAR licensing on behalf of the Department of Commerce for commodities, software, and technology subject to the EAR, provided those commodities, software, and technology are to be used in or with defense articles controlled in USML Category XIV and are described in the purchase documentation submitted with the application. The intent of paragraph (x) is not to impose ITAR jurisdiction on commodities, software, and technology subject to EAR controls. Items described in paragraph (x) remain subject to the jurisdiction of the EAR. The Department added the paragraph as a regulatory reference point in response to industry requests to be able to use a Department of State license to export shipments that have a mix of ITAR controlled items and EAR controlled items for use in or with items described in that category.
  • Finally, this rule establishes USML control in subparagraph (f)(2) of certain chemical or biological agent equipment only when it contains reagents, algorithms, coefficients, software, libraries, spectral databases, or alarm set point levels developed under a Department of Defense contract or other funding authorization.

EAR:

This final rule creates five new “600 series” ECCNs in CCL Category 1 (ECCNs 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, 1D607, and 1E607) that clarify the EAR controls applicable to certain dissemination, detection and protection “equipment” and related items that the President has determined no longer warrant control under USML Category XIV. Terms such as “part,” “component” “accessories,” “attachments,” and “specially designed” are applied in the same manner in this rule as those terms are defined in Section 772.1 of the EAR. In addition, to assist exporters in determining the control status of their items, a “Specially Designed” Decision Tool and a CCL Order of Review Decision Tool are available on the BIS Web site at: http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/decision-tree-tools.

  • New ECCN 1A607 Military dissemination “equipment” for riot control agents, military detection and protection “equipment” for toxicological agents (including chemical, biological, and riot control agents), and related commodities. In new ECCN 1A607, paragraphs .a through .d, paragraph .i, and paragraphs .l through .w are reserved. Paragraph .e of ECCN 1A607 controls “equipment” “specially designed” for military use and for the dissemination of any of the riot control agents controlled in ECCN 1C607.a. Paragraph .f of ECCN 1A607 controls protection “equipment” “specially designed” for military use and for defense against either materials controlled by USML Category XIV(a) or (b) or any of the riot control agents in new ECCN 1C607.a. Paragraph .g of ECCN 1A607 controls decontamination “equipment” not controlled by USML Category XIV(f) that is “specially designed” for military use and for the decontamination of objects contaminated with materials controlled by USML Category XIV(a) or (b). Paragraph .h controls “equipment” not controlled by USML Category XIV(f) that is “specially designed” for military use and for the detection or identification of either materials specified by USML Category XIV(a) or (b) or riot control agents controlled by new ECCN 1C607.a. Paragraph .j controls “equipment” “specially designed” to: (i) Interface with a detector, shelter, vehicle, vessel, or aircraft controlled by the USML or a “600 series” ECCN; and (ii) collect and process samples of articles controlled in USML Category XIV(a) or (b). Paragraph .k controls medical countermeasures that are “specially designed” for military use (including pre- and post- treatments, antidotes, and medical diagnostics) and “specially designed” to counter chemical agents controlled by USML Category XIV(a). Paragraph .x controls “parts,” “components,” “accessories,” and “attachments” that are “specially designed” for a commodity controlled under ECCN 1A607.e, .f, .g, .h, or .j or a defense article controlled in USML Category XIV(f) and that are not enumerated or otherwise described elsewhere in the USML.
  • New ECCN 1B607 Military test, inspection, and production “equipment” and related commodities “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of commodities identified in ECCN 1A607 or 1C607, or defense articles enumerated or otherwise described in USML Category XIV.
  • In new ECCN 1B607, paragraph .a controls “equipment,” not including incinerators, that is “specially designed” for the destruction of chemical agents controlled by USML Category XIV(a). Paragraph .b of ECCN 1B607 controls test facilities and “equipment” that are “specially designed” for military certification, qualification, or testing of commodities controlled by new ECCN 1A607.e, .f, .g, .h, or .j or by USML Category XIV(f), except for XIV(f)(1). Paragraph .c of ECCN 1B607 controls tooling and “equipment” “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of commodities controlled under new ECCN 1A607.e, .f, .g, .h, or .j or USML Category XIV(f). Paragraphs .d through .w are reserved. Paragraph .x controls “parts,” “components,” “accessories,” and “attachments,” not enumerated or otherwise described elsewhere in the USML, that are “specially designed” for a commodity controlled by ECCN 1B607.b or .c or for a defense article controlled by USML Category XIV(f). As indicated above, ECCN 1B607.b does not control test facilities and “equipment” that are “specially designed” for military certification, qualification, or testing of commodities and are enumerated or otherwise described in USML Category XIV(f)(1), as set forth in State’s companion rule to this final rule (e.g., see the equipment in USML Category XIV(f)(1)(ii) that is “specially designed” for testing the articles controlled in paragraph (a), (b), (c), (e), or (f)(4) of USML Category XIV). In addition to the test facilities and “equipment” controlled by ECCN 1B607.b, see the tooling and “equipment” classified under ECCN 2B350 or 2B352 for producing the chemical/biological agents, precursors, or defoliants described in USML Category XIV(a), (b), (c), or (e). The EAR also control tooling and “equipment” to produce the antibodies/polynucleotides and vaccines described in USML Category XIV(g) and (h), respectively, as follows: lab “equipment” designated as EAR99 under the EAR; biological dual-use “equipment” (including protective “equipment”) classified under ECCN 2B352; and EAR-controlled biological systems for making vaccines (involving the use of mice, rabbits, etc.).
  • New ECCN 1C607?Tear gases, riot control agents and materials for the detection and decontamination of chemical warfare agents. New ECCN 1C607.a controls specified tear gases and riot control agents. Paragraph .b of ECCN 1C607 controls “biopolymers” not controlled by USML Category XIV(g) that are “specially designed” or processed for the detection or identification of chemical warfare (CW) agents specified by USML Category XIV(a) and the cultures of specific cells used to produce them. Paragraph .c controls specified “biocatalysts” and biological systems that are not controlled by USML Category XIV(g) and are “specially designed” for the decontamination or degradation of CW agents specified by USML Category XIV(a). Paragraph .d controls chemical mixtures not controlled by USML Category XIV(f) that are “specially designed” for military use for the decontamination of objects contaminated with materials specified by USML Category XIV(a) or (b).
  • New ECCN 1D607?“Software” “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” operation, or maintenance of items controlled by 1A607, 1B607 or 1C607. New ECCN 1D607.a controls “software” “specially designed” for the “development,” “production,” operation, or maintenance of items controlled by ECCN 1A607, 1B607 or 1C607. Paragraph .b of ECCN 1D607 is reserved.
  • New ECCN 1E607?“Technology” “required” for the “development,” “production,” operation, installation, maintenance, repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of items controlled by ECCN 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, or 1D607. New ECCN 1E607.a controls “technology” “required” for the “development,” “production,” operation, installation, maintenance, repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of items controlled by ECCN 1A607, 1B607, 1C607, or 1D607. Paragraph .b of ECCN 1E607 is reserved.
  • Amendments to License Exceptions BAG and TMP related to Individual Protection “Equipment” in ECCN 1A607.f. This final rule amends the License Exception BAG provisions in Section 740.14(h) of the EAR to authorize exports, reexports, or in-country transfers of chemical or biological agent protective gear consistent with the requirements and restrictions described therein. In a corresponding change, this final rule also amends the License Exception TMP provisions in Section 740.9(a)(11) of the EAR to authorize temporary exports, reexports, or in-country transfers of chemical or biological agent protective gear consistent with the requirements and restrictions described therein. The amendments to License Exceptions BAG and TMP also change the requirements for Afghanistan to be consistent with those of the majority of other Country Group D:5 destinations (i.e., the U.S. person authorized to use the license exception must be affiliated with the U.S. Government and be traveling on official business or traveling in support of a U.S. Government contract). The same requirement applies to the use of these license exception provisions for Iraq, also a D:5 country, with the additional option that the U.S. person must be traveling to Iraq under a direct authorization by the Government of Iraq and engaging in activities for, on behalf of, or at the request of, the Government of Iraq. These amendments are also intended to ensure that the scope of these license exceptions, as they apply to chemical or biological agent protective gear controlled under new ECCN 1A607.f, conforms with the scope of the ITAR exemption for personal protective equipment in Section 123.17 of the ITAR (e.g., by correcting the provisions for Afghanistan, as described above, to be consistent with those of the majority of other Country Group D:5 destinations).

Middle Man in Illegal Exports Debarred for 8 Years

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Walter Anders and his company Terand, Inc. (he was the sole employee) of Huntersville, NC has been debarred for 8 years for his connection in exporting carbon fiber to Singapore. Anders and his company were used as a middle man to send illegal exports from a company in Middlewtown, NY to a company in Singapore in exchange for multiple $1,400 kick backs.

In 2012, Performance Engineered Nonwovens, of Middletown, NY, was contacted by BIS and told that their license to export T300 carbon fiber (ECCN 1C210.a) to Singapore was revoked due to the concerns surrounding the recipient. Performance Engineered Nonwovens then sought out to find a way to conceal the shipments to Singapore, cue Walter Anders and Terand.  Within a few weeks Anders and the president of Performance Engineered Nonwovens, Peter Gromacki, agreed to have Terand falsely act as the US exporter of record for exports of the items to Singapore in return for a $1,400 commission for each successful export.

Terand created and issued commercial invoices on letterhead that falsely named Terand as the exporter and falsely stated that, “This commodity technology exported from the United States is in accordance with the Export administration Regulations.” The company also acted as the intermediary between Performance Engineered Nonwovens and the freight forwarder, providing instructions to the forwarder, signing any and all required shipping documents, and receiving status reports on the progress of exports to Singapore. Terand also appeared as the US Principal Party in Interest (USPPI) on all of the Shipper’s Export Declarations (SED) that were filed.

Over the course of 2012 Terand made 8 exports of T300 carbon fiber to Singapore (approximately 6,557kg). Gromacki (Performance Engineered Nonwovens president) ensured that this process would continue and told Walter Anders that, “You continue to play a crucial role. I cannot export without your help and hence the commission checks will continue to flow in your direction.”

Walter Anders and his company, Terand, have been charged with 8 counts of Causing, Aiding, and/or Abetting Unlicensed Exports. The 8 illegal exports were valued at $288,736, Anders received $11,200 in commissions and 8 years of debarment.

Federal Register: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2016/08/19/2016-19819/in-the-matter-of-walter-anders-10701-huntersville-commons-drive-suite-c-huntersville-nc-28078-terand

BIS Extends Temporary General License for ZTE Entities

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

On March 24, 2016, a final rule was published that created a temporary general license that allowed, for a short time period, two entities (ZTE Corporation and ZTE Kangxun) that had been added to the Entity List on March 8, 2016, to be able to take part in exports, reexports, and transfers (in- country).

BIS has decided to extend the temporary general license until November 28, 2016. Due to this extension, the final rule will remove the date of August 30, 2016 and substitute the newest expiration date of November 28, 2016. No other changes have been made to the license.

Federal Register Notice: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-08-19/pdf/2016-19828.pdf

Screen Your Parties’ Addresses & Screen Before Shipments: Experienced and Sophisticated Company Fined $90,000 for One Export of EAR99 Item

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: Danielle McClellan

Spectrolab is an experienced and sophisticated exporter, according to BIS’s Order related to the illegal export of a Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (EAR99).  You may be thinking, EAR99 items don’t need a license so how is there an illegal export, but as the title states…screening is important and will find violations that otherwise are not obvious to the naked eye.

In this case, Spectrolab sold and transferred a Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator to a party on the Entity List in Pakistan. SUPARCO (Pakistan’s Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission) was added to the list in 1999 after it was found that they were involved in nuclear or missile activities. SUPARCO used a procurement agent to obtain the simulator from Spectrolab in 2014. Initially the agent said the item was for Pakistan’s Institute of Space Technology (IST) but soon after Spectrolab was made aware that SUPARCO was involved in the transaction. The procurement agent provided Spectrolab with the names and every party involved in the transaction except SUPARCO. Spectrolab screened the names, but not the addresses that they received from the agent which would have alerted them that SUPARCO was on the Entity List as their address was listed as IST.

Spectrolab even hosted an inspection and training session on installation and operation with an engineer from SUPARCO. The engineer even attended the training wearing a SUPARCO badge. As a result, Spectrolab was fully aware that SUPARCO was the end user of the simulator before they ever exported it. Spectrolab failed to run or re-run its screening software to screen either the SUPARCO name or address in connection with the final shipment, a direct contradiction of their own export compliance plan.

There were a few things that went wrong in this case for Spectrolab:

  1. They didn’t screen the companies address; if this was initially done the entire process would have stopped before it even started. BIS noted in the Order that Spectrolab used an export control screening software.
  2. No one raised the question of why the engineer worked for SUPARCO instead of IST or why the end user was SUPARCO instead of IST. This is really where the break down occurred
  3. They didn’t re-run their screening software before shipping the item to Pakistan

The biggest take away from this case is to screen everything about your customers, and that the government expects you to catch on to oddities related to your shipments. In this case, the company name changing, it’s not surprising that no one knew that SUPARCO was on the Entity List, there’s thousands on that list. The issue is that there was a red flag with SUPARCO coming into the transaction but not being listed on the documents. Entities who are on the denial list will be sneaky, and BIS expects you to catch that…that just didn’t happen in this case.

Order:  https://efoia.bis.doc.gov/index.php/electronic-foia/index-of-documents/7-electronic-foia/227-export-violations

EAR and ITAR Will Require the Same New Destination Control Statement on November 15, 2016

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 by Danielle McClellan

By: John Black

In the August 17, 2016 Federal Register the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) and the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) announced that effective November 1, 2016, the same Destination Control Statements (DCS) will be required for exports under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and exports under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR).  The good news is that exporters no longer will have to use one statement for EAR exports and a different statement for ITAR exports.

The bad news is neither the current EAR DCS nor the current ITAR DCS will be required under the new rules.  When it comes to reprogramming our software that prints documents, it might have been easier if the government had chosen one of the existing statements already in use.  On the other hand, several adjustments to the ITAR and EAR will make life easier for exporters in the long run.

 

Practical Considerations When Implementing the Change

As you prepare to comply with the requirement to comply with the new rules beginning on for the November 15, 2016, here are some important considerations.

 

The New DCS:

‘‘These items are controlled by the U.S. Government and authorized for export only to the country of ultimate destination for use by the ultimate consignee or end-user(s) herein identified. They may not be resold, transferred, or otherwise disposed of, to any other country or to any person other than the authorized ultimate consignee or end-user(s), either in their original form or after being incorporated into other items, without first obtaining approval from the U.S. government or as otherwise authorized by U.S. law and regulations.’’

 

(Interestingly to me, the EAR Federal Register notice does not put a period after the last word “regulations” in the EAR DCS while the ITAR Federal Register notice does place a period after the last word “regulations” in the ITAR DCS.  I doubt anybody else noticed that.  I also doubt this is a deliberate conspiracy by DDTC and BIS to set up exporters who do not properly include or not include the period in their DCS.)

 

When the DCS Is Required:

  • ITAR:  For all defense articles exported in tangible form
  • EAR:  For all items exported in tangible form except a DCS is not required for EAR99 items and items eligible for license exceptions BAG or GFT.

 

ITAR and EAR DCS Required only for Tangible Shipments.  A DCS is not required for items being exported in intangible form such as electronic, oral or visual exports.

 

Where Do You Have to Put the DCS:   The new DCS must be put on the commercial invoice, and not on the airway bill, bill of lading, or other documents.

 

Other Information You Must Put on the Commercial Invoice:  The ITAR and EAR will require the following be put on the commercial invoice, in addition to the DCS:

 

  • ITAR:  1) The country of ultimate destination,

2) The end-user, and

3) The license or other approval number or exemption citation.

  • EAR:    The ECCN for any 9×515 or 600 series items

 

Information Required When Using ITAR Authorizations to Export EAR-Controlled Items:  The new rule clearly requires that when an ITAR license or authorization (exemption) is used to export EAR controlled items, the exporter must give the ECCN or EAR99 classification for each EAR-controlled item to the end-user and consignees.

Removal of Special Requirements for Certain EAR Exports to India:  The new EAR rule will remove the special DCS requirement for exports to India of items controlled for crime control column 1 or 3 reasons or regional stability column 2 reasons.

Other ITAR Changes

Exports of EAR Items under ITAR Exemptions:  The rule clarifies that EAR Items may be exported under ITAR exemptions only if they are being shipped with ITAR items.

Changes to Required Language in ITAR Agreements and Transmittal Letters:  The rule makes several changes to the required language and clauses in ITAR agreements and transmittal letters.

To see the new EAR and ITAR rules, go to http://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/regulations/federal-register-notices#fr54721